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Djokovic wins record sixth Key Biscayne title

first_imgKEY BISCAYNE, Florida (AP):Novak Djokovic won a record-tying sixth Key Biscayne title and his third in a row yesterday, beating Kei Nishikori 6-3, 6-3 in the Miami Open final.The top-ranked Djokovic improved to 28-1 this year. His only loss came when he retired during his quarter-final against Feliciano Lopez in Dubai with an eye infection.Djokovic won his 28th ATP Masters title, breaking the record he shared with Rafael Nadal, and won both Indian Wells and the Miami Open for the third year in a row. He didn’t lose a set in the tournament and tied Andre Agassi’s record of six men’s titles at Key Biscayne.The No. 6-seeded Nishikori lost to Djokovic for the sixth consecutive time and was doomed by an erratic serve. He double-faulted five times and Djokovic repeatedly pounced on his second serve to break five times.The weather was less oppressive than in recent days, with highs only in the 70s, but Djokovic made sure the match didn’t become an endurance test. He broke in three of Nishikori’s first four service games, dominating rallies in part because Nishikori’s shots lacked the precision of earlier matches.Nishikori required treatment from a trainer on his left thigh late in the second set, but his bigger problem was his opponent.- APlast_img read more

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SunStone Signs Deal for Seventh InfinityClass Ship

first_imgzoomSunStone Infinity class. Image Courtesy: SunStone Miami-based SunStone Ships has signed an agreement for the construction of its seventh Infinity-class ship in Hong Kong, China.The vessel, ordered on May 29, 2019, has a long-term charter agreement in place.Featuring a length of 104 meters and a width of 18 meters, the unit will be capable of carrying between 130-200 passengers and 85 to 115 crew members.The latest cruise ship is scheduled for delivery in September 2021.The company’s previously ordered Infinity-class vessels, currently under construction, are scheduled to join the SunStone fleet in August 2019, October 2020, January 2021, March 2022, September 2022 and October 2022, respectively.The vessels are Ice Class 1A, Polar Code 6 and are being built with Safe Return to Port, Dynamic Positioning, and Zero Speed Stabilizers.last_img read more

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Postalworkers union wants Canada Post to come clean on theft statistics

first_imgVANCOUVER – The union representing postal workers wants Canada Post to release the number of community mailboxes that have been broken into across the country.Mike Palecek, national president of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, said he’s frustrated by the Crown corporation’s unwillingness to share how frequently mail theft occurs.“We know it’s a problem and we know it’s a big problem,” Palecek said Monday in an interview. “We’re trying to find out how big so we can look for solutions.”The union has campaigned for the restoration of door-to-door service since the former Conservative government announced in 2013 it would be cutting the service. The Liberals campaigned in the last federal election to restore home delivery, and the results of a review into the future of Canada Post are expected to be released later this year.Palecek said that while exact numbers are unavailable, anecdotal reports from postal workers indicate that mail sent to between 1,500 and 4,000 addresses in Richmond, B.C., is being held.That could be for a variety of reasons, including break-ins to apartment panels or damaged community mailboxes, he said.“We’re just trying to know what we’re dealing with here. This should be a simple question.”Canada Post spokesman Jon Hamilton disputed the union’s claims, saying there are only 1,000 townhomes in Richmond that are without postal service, and none of them receive mail via community mailboxes.All of those addresses are part of a single development where private mailboxes were vandalized and have yet to be repaired, he said, adding that the boxes are the responsibility of the residents association.“We take security of the mail very seriously,” Hamilton said, adding that Canada Post does not release statistics on mailbox theft or vandalism because of security concerns.“We work with police so there’s no secret. It’s just we don’t provide those publicly.”Canada Post doesn’t want to encourage thefts and doesn’t discuss security measures it puts in place, he said.Home delivery started to be phased out in 2015, but the Liberals stopped the process pending the review of Canada Post’s operations.— Follow @gwomand on Twitterlast_img read more

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Ellies 2009 Fast Company Editor We Know Were Lucky to be Doing

first_imgMansueto Ventures’ Fast Company, the 725,000-circ. business magazine, has been nominated by the American Association of Magazine Editors for general excellence in the 500,000 to 1 million circulation category at tonight’s National Magazine Awards. (The magazine won a general excellence Ellie in 1999 and was a finalist in 2000.)Fast Company editor and managing director Robert Safian [pictured] spoke with FOLIO: about this year’s general excellence nomination.FOLIO:: How did you react when you found out Fast Company was nominated?Safian: I was very excited. I sent an email to the staff titled, “Let the celebrations begin.”  I’m mindful that being nominated is a tremendous recognition. Even if we don’t come back with an Ellie, the team should feel like winners. They’ve earned it. FOLIO:: The nomination is for several issues. Why did you submit those particular issues? What was the biggest story you covered there?Safian: We chose the issues we felt were most eclectic, dynamic and accessible. The one issue we knew we had to include was June, because it features a 19,000-word, 24-page article written by Richard Behar and edited by executive editor Will Bourne titled “China Storms Africa” [which is also nominated for excellence in reporting]. It was our single biggest editorial investment of the year.FOLIO:: What was your biggest challenge in putting those issues together?Safian: We are a smaller publisher, with fewer resources than most of our competitors. Our challenge is to do more with less. Fortunately, the writers and editors on our team have an uncanny ability to mix discipline with creativity.FOLIO:: It’s a tough time for magazines and for business magazines in general. How do you keep your editors motivated and optimistic?Safian: We know that we’re lucky to be doing what we do.FOLIO:: Will Fast Company exist in print five years from now?Safian: There will be plenty of print magazines in five years. We certainly hope to be one of them.last_img read more

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Quader finds BNP manifesto joke of the year

first_imgBangladesh Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader. File PhotoDescribing BNP’s election manifesto as a colourful balloon full of unrealistic pledges, Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader on Tuesday said it will implode immediately if the party comes to power, reports UNB.”BNP has presented some unrealistic and weird promises which can’t be fulfilled,” he said, describing the election manifesto as the best joke of the year.The AL leader came up with the remarks while talking to reporters at a restaurant by the Dhaka-Chattogram highway in Chouddagram upazila of the district.BNP rolled out its manifesto for the 11th parliamentary elections on Tuesday with a set of promises, including making democracy an everyday practice, building a vengeance -free Bangladesh and raising GDP growth to 11 percent.last_img read more

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Nier Is Not My Name

first_imgBy Dr. Kaye Wise Whitehead, Special to the AFROI grew up learning how to hold my rage, to swallow my pain, and to stand up tall even when I felt like I had the weight of the world on my shoulders. I spent every summer in South Carolina, around women who had come of age during the days of Jim Crow and who made it a point, to teach me about the power and strength of Blackness. There were days when it was overwhelming (exhausting, really) to be Black and to have to deal with Whiteness as the standard through which everything else was measured. My grandmother despised this standard and the notions of White privilege. Her neighborhood was filled with Confederate flags and White men who dared to call her auntie. She remembers being called n—-r almost as much as she was called her name. I was seven the first time that I can remember being called a n—-r. My grandmother used that moment to teach me how to respond and say, with confidence and without bending my head, that n—-r was not my name. She made me stand in front of the mirror and say it over and over again until I could say without tears in my eyes, without looking away, and without internalizing the power of this word. She told me that some words were designed to strip black people of both our power and our voice. “White people,” she said, “need us to be their n—–s so that they can feel superior. Don’t give them that. N—-r is not your name, nor your legacy. You may not understand that today but you will and when you do, make sure you tell somebody else.”Dr. Karsonya Wise Whitehead (Courtesy Photo)I thought about my grandmother’s words while I was preparing to speak at the Maryland Lynching Memorial Project. I sat in my office watching videos and looking through photographs of Black bodies hanging from trees. I studied the faces of the White men and women who were casually standing around, talking and laughing, as Black people were being tortured and abused, cut and burned. I looked at the children and wondered who they grew up to be, after learning to normalize Black death and suffering. I listened to interviews from White people who spoke about why they had to kill that n—-r, almost as if they were doing God’s work. The n—-r to them was a nameless and faceless monster that threatened white supremacy, white nationalism, and white superiority. The n—-r, as James Baldwin once said, is an invention of White people that show their fear of Black people.According to the Equal Justice Initiative, nearly 3,959 Black men, women, and children were lynched in the twelve Southern states between 1877 and 1950 and, so far, 40 of them have been documented to have happened right here in Maryland. On that day, I wanted to speak their names and to speak for the victims that had not been identified yet. I wanted to say, loud and clear, that n—-r was not their name. I wanted to speak for those who had been terrorized; those who had been stalked; those who had been harassed; and, those who had been beaten and tortured. I wanted to speak for them because those of who are still here must not forget. We must hold the power of collective memory and teach it to others.I thought about all of this when I visited Bard High School Early College in Baltimore. I walked into the school and walked past a group of Black male students laughing and calling each the n-word. I was on my way to the office, but I decided to stop and ask them why they were using that word. Now, that was not the first time that I heard young people use the n-word, but after spending so many days immersed in lynching history, I could not just walk by. They said that it was a form of affection and that it was not a big deal. They said that everybody did it and that it was ok if you were Black.I stood there and looked at them because I wanted to tell them about the history of this word and about what James Baldwin said. I wanted to show them the lynching pictures on my phone and talk about how our blood, as Frederick Douglass once said, is mixed with the soil of this land. I wanted to challenge them to think deeply about the power of their words, but I did not know where to start. How do you collapse 400 hundred years of oppression and hatred, of white supremacy and white nationalism, lynching, and torture into five minutes? As I stood there thinking about all of this, the hallways filled up, and the students started moving toward class. One young man stayed behind because he wanted to know why I questioned them and what was the big deal with that word. I thought about my grandmother at that moment, and I smiled, because n—-r, I said, is not your name nor your legacy. You may not understand that today but you will and when you do, make sure you tell somebody else.Karsonya Wise Whitehead is the #blackmommyactivist and an associate professor of communication and African and African American studies at Loyola University Maryland. She is the host of “Today With Dr. Kaye” on WEAA 88.9 FM and the author of the forthcoming “Dispatches from Baltimore: The Birth of the Black Mommy Activist.” She lives in Baltimore City with her husband and their two sons.The opinions on this page are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the AFRO.Send letters to The Afro-American • 1531 S. Edgewood St. Baltimore, MD 21227 or fax to 1-877-570-9297 or e-mail to editor@afro.com.last_img read more

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