Tag: 重庆品茶今题

When a plan comes together

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Read more…

Brazilians divided on impeachment of President Bolsonaro: poll

first_imgBrazilians are split on impeaching President Jair Bolsonaro despite a majority believing accusations by the former justice minister that Bolsonaro tried to interfere with the federal police’s work for political gain, a poll conducted on Monday showed.Pollster Datafolha found that 48 percent oppose impeaching Bolsonaro while 45 percent of those surveyed want to see him impeached, a difference within the margin of error of the poll.Sergio Moro, a popular minister because of his record fighting corruption as a federal judge, resigned as justice minister on Friday, accusing the president of attempting to interfere in sensitive police investigations involving family members. Bolsonaro said the accusations were unfounded.For 52 percent of those polled by Datafolha, Moro was telling the truth and only 20 percent said they believed Bolsonaro’s account.While Brazilians are split on Congress removing the president by impeachment, the number that believe Bolsonaro should resign has risen to 46 percent from 37 percent in the previous poll at the beginning of April. Those opposed to his resigning have decreased to 50 percent from 59 percent.A main reason for discontent with Bolsonaro has been his handling of the coronavirus epidemic, whose gravity he has downplayed as the death toll rises in Brazil. The poll found 45 percent consider his handling bad or terrible against 27 percent who think he has done a good or excellent job.The Datafolha poll showed that Bolsonaro has hung on to his core support, with the positive approval rating of his government rising to 33 percent from 30 percent in December. Its negative numbers have risen to 38 percent from 36 percent four months ago.Datafolha polled 1,503 people by telephone on Monday. The poll has a margin of error of 3 percentage points up or down.Topics :last_img read more

Read more…

High cost of travel affecting Dominica’s tourism sector

first_imgSimon WalshThe leading organization on the island that has been fostering and promoting tourism in Dominica for more than three decades, is citing accessibility to the island as one of the main challenges currently affecting the industry.At the 40th Annual General Meeting of the Dominica Hotel and Tourism Association (DHTA), the President, Mr Simon Walsh noted that while DHTA celebrated many accomplishments during his tenure as president, the challenges continue to mount amidst the global financial crisis.The DHTA President believes that the high travel cost and the prolonged travel time to Dominica are two of the major factors contributing to the decline in the industry.“The number one issue in the tourism industry from 1972 to 2011 is access to Dominica. Let us not ever forget access, access, access. There has been improvements and I can honestly say that the private se ctor recognizes this fact that The Discover Dominica Authority and the Ministry of Tourism are throwing themselves across that wall and trying to improve on that issue. We’ve seen Air BVI coming in from St Maarteen, we’ve seen JEANS Ferry Service coming in to Portsmouth starting this month, we have Sunshine Airline that will be servicing San Juan Airports hopefully in October; so we’re seeing improvements. But the brutal reality is how much does it cost to come from the east coast of the United States to Dominica? In December, it will be US$1,200, taking two days to reach to Washington D.C. So if you’re sitting in Washington D.C and thinking of taking a trip of a lifetime, you could be in Africa on safari looking at elephants; cheaper and faster than you could be in Dominica looking at a broadfish.” The DHTA’s is pledging to continue its mission to promote tourism and related services as a critical sector in Dominica’s economic development and to work closely with all stakeholders to create and sustain an enabling environment that will support members’ efforts to improve the standards of their products and the quality of their services.Mr Walsh said that they also recognize the efforts of Discover Dominica Authority (DDA) and the Ministry of Tourism in putting strategies and plans in place in addressing the critical issues affecing the tourism industry.“It’s a difficult financial world that we are in right now and many airlines are losing money. So no matter how many good things we do, if we can’t find an airline that can make money flying into Dominica, we’ll never find an airline to fly into Dominica. They have to do it and they have to make money. We should think of new and different ways because we’re having trouble convincing airlines to come. How can the government of Dominica sit down and partnership with an airline and create an airline that will fly and service the tourism industry of Dominica? The DHTA’s job is to make sure that the stakeholders’ issues are represented in the public sector”.The tourism industry is currently the leading contributor to Dominica’s economy. In 2010, tourism contributed EC$243 million to the economy, an increase by sixty eight percent (68%) compared to 2005, just five years ago.Hon. Ian DouglasMinister for Tourism and Legal Affairs, Honorable Ian Douglas said that the government has been working closely with stakeholders like Discover Dominica Authority to ensure that the experience is a lasting one for visitors.He confirmed that great strides have been made in delivery of services within the industry, however more focus needs to be placed on marketing the destination.“We need to be cognizant that this industry is quite competitive, and in order to survive in this market we have to make our destination as marketable as our competitors. Our service has to be of international standard, the product we offer (including our rooms) has to be up to international standards, visitors are very savvy, their expectations are great and we always have to meet and exceed their expectations to keep them coming back and to spread the good news about Dominica as a destination”.The Government is also placing great emphasis and focus on community/rural tourism, an area the minister says will strengthen tourism capacity and potential in several communities around the island.“I am sure many of you are aware that the Tourism Sector Development Programme supported by the European Union’s Special Framework of Assistance (SFA) 2006, which was implemented from 2008 to 2010, has injected approximately €1.4 million or EC5.1 million into the programme. This programme targeted specific projects in community tourism to foster expansion of rural tourism, provision of technical assistance to community groups and destination marketing. Under the rural tourism component of the Tourism Sector Development Programme, eleven new and existing community tourism groups were strengthened through human resource development, infrastructural development and marketing. Specifically, infrastructure work on construction of new facilities were undertaken at the Indian River in Portsmouth, Wotten Waven, Bellevue Chopin and Layou. Upgrading of faciliteis was undertaken in Vieille Case and at the L’escalier Tete Chien in Sineku.The New Board which will now serve from 2011 to 2011 consists of:President – Ms. Yvonne ArmourImmediate Past President and Director – Simon WalshVice President – Nikima RoyerExecutive Secretary – Renee Whitchurch Aird-DouglasTreasurer – Carol RabessDirectors -Richard Stanton, Arienne Perryman, Michael Bunche and Tanaquil PfundAdministrative Assistant, David ThornhillThe Dominica Hotel & Tourism Association (DHTA) was first formed in 1972.Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! LocalNews High cost of travel affecting Dominica’s tourism sector by: – October 18, 2011 63 Views   no discussions Sharecenter_img Tweet Share Sharelast_img read more

Read more…

Filmmaker Lav Diaz discusses organic documentation

first_img“That’s the beauty of organic methodology where you don’t know anything, you’re just discovering things every day, you’re discovering things as you go along,” Diaz said. “It’s a very fluid thing.” Acclaimed Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz followed a screening of his documentary “Storm Children, Book One” with a Q&A at the Albert and Dana Broccoli Theatre Monday night. The two-and-a-half-hour long film follows the daily lives of a group of children in Tacloban City months after Typhoon Yolanda, the largest and deadliest typhoon in the Philippines’ history.  “We have focused primarily on East Asia, which is China, Japan, Korea,” Ryu said. “But we do hope to expand to Southeast Asia and South Asia so this was a wonderful opportunity to bring a Southeast Asian filmmaker here to campus.” Lav Diaz’s latest film titled “Storm Children, Book One” documents the experiences of children from Tacloban City in the Philippines following the historic and destructive Typhoon Yolanda. (Mia Islas | Daily Trojan) The documentary subverts many expectations American audiences hold when walking into a theater. There is little dialogue and no underscoring; the film structure is simply a procession of tableaux, where the camera is at a fixed angle and rarely moves. One of the most touching moments is when two boys unearth a small ball from a pile of wreckage which audiences watch them dig through for a half hour.  “There’s this endlessly fascinating sequence in the film where the boys are unearthing things that clearly had been buried after the ravages of the storm,” Ago said. “And, quite frankly, it was almost hypnotic, just sort of following what they were doing there, especially when they actually start extracting things.”  The screening, which was moderated by Alex Ago, director of programing and special projects at the School of Cinematic Arts, was a collaboration between SCA, the American Cinematheque and the East Asian Studies Center. Grace Ryu, the associate director of the East Asian Studies Center, was familiar with Diaz’s work through streaming his other films and thought the screening was the perfect opportunity to expand the center’s programming. Diaz told the crowd about how he met the children at the focal point of the project and how he gained their permission to film them. “They just forgot about the storm, just forgot about the devastation,” Diaz said. “I was struck by their innocence and their beauty, so I started focusing on them.”  “We start very observational, but then as things progress, we start to actually see a little bit more of the filmmaker, because they’re speaking to [Diaz] directly,” Ago said. center_img “The first time that I went there, I noticed the kids,” Diaz said. “It’s really chaotic and at the same time it’s real, when that storm happened … So many people came, even Anderson Cooper was there, so it’s the whole world that’s coming. I was behind the scenes shooting them, and then I noticed the kids.” The majority of the footage showed children sifting through rubble in hopes of finding something of value or children playing in the flooded streets. This caught Diaz’s attention, as the children had returned to their normal activities while the adults were still immobilized by shock and grief.  Diaz is a stylistic filmmaker, known for his frequent use of black and white and his pioneering role in the slow cinema movement, with many of his films having a run time of around nine hours. While the runtime of this documentary is only a fraction of his typical work, he utilizes the same long, drawn-out shots he is famous for.  Diaz did not arrive in the Philippines with the intention of focusing his project on children, but the protagonists of his story became evident when he saw young people frequently ignored by  post-disaster mainstream media coverage.  Filmmaker Lav Diaz was struck by innocence and resilient nature of Tacloban City children in the Philippines. (Mia Islas | Daily Trojan) It is the juxtaposition of the horrific tragedy the community is struggling to heal from and the way the children maintain their playful attitudes that makes this an acclaimed documentary. In one shot, a group of young girls sings Frozen’s “Let It Go” as the camera focuses on a broken road filled with remnants of destroyed homes. The disaster zone is turned into a waterpark as children use broken roofs to raft down flooded streets and turn abandoned ships into diving boards. Despite the lack of narrative elements viewers expect, the documentary’s emotional resonance comes through the ceaseless daily activities that suck the audience in. Diaz said he had no expectation or narrative in mind when he arrived in Tacloban but rather allowed the real lives of the people recovering to tell the story.  “I just stayed there. I lived there for a month, and then they became my friends, they didn’t mind it at all. I said, ‘I’m going to shoot you guys and follow your lives.’”last_img read more

Read more…