Tag: 不准不开心论坛

Production Tips for Mixing Digital Camcorder and DSLR Footage

first_imgHow to Soften Your Sharp 4K DSLR Video FootageInvisibility: The Secret to Editing and Shooting an InterviewPost-Production Tips: How to Save Corrupted Footage5 Faster Editing Tips for Premiere Pro + Free FootageFree Practical Lighting Techniques for a Cinematic LookCover image by wellphoto. For more videography and editing tips, check out these additional resources. Learn to fuse the best of both filmmaking worlds with these tips for mixing camcorder and DSLR (or mirrorless) camera footage.While mixing camcorder and DSLR or mirrorless camera footage is rarely ideal, in the world of professional filmmaking and videography, it does happen more often than you’d think. The most common example comes from recording longform events, like weddings or stage performances, with a wide camcorder that can record uninterrupted for long periods of time — combined with shooting stylized close-ups and side shots with a faster-lensed prosumer digital camera.What results is a frustrating combination of image quality and competing codecs and recording formats. However, mixing the two is possible. It may mean some sacrifices, but if you plan accordingly, you can still get the best combined footage possible. Let’s look at some tips and tricks on how to do it.Pick the Right CamerasImage by MaeManee.In an ideal world, you’d get the chance to at least pick the best camcorders and digital cameras to combine. (However in the real world, you may just be working with what you have available — or what footage was sent to you as an editor.) If you can, try to pick a camcorder that can record as close as possible to 1080p Full HD with the largest available sensor for your budget. For your digital camera, you can chase large-sensor 4K recording as much as you’d like, but you may also need to be aware of recording time and storage for long shoots.Match Recording SettingsImage by SKphotographer.Once you have both your camcorder and digital camera(s) ready to go, try your best to match the recording settings. If you’re looking to use your digital cameras’ cinematic looks as much as possible, you’ll want to record at 24fps. Camcorders typically default to 30fps or higher, so you can go ahead and change that to match. From there, if you can match the shutter speed you’ll be in better position to start mixing in the edit.Outside Audio RecordingImage by Maksim Fesenko.Neither camcorders nor digital cameras have the best reputations for recording quality audio. I’d recommend using an outside option like a Zoom H1, Zoom H4, or a TASCAM DR-40. If you’re shooting an event that has a board operator working with microphones, try to find a direct link to the board.Find a Middle Ground in the EditImage by Gorodenkoff.After you’ve recorded your footage with both your camcorder and digital camera, you can begin the process of matching the footage in your edit. If the goal is to create a seamless match so both formats look identical, you have your work cut out for you — but it is doable. You’ll just need to find a happy middle ground.For the DSLR or mirrorless digital footage, the name of the game is retrograding. You’ll want to keep your shallow depth of field, but you’ll be looking to soften your contrasts and even adding grain and distortion at times.For your camcorder, you want to push your footage as far as you can to add sharpness, contrast, and definition. You can even add blur to objects in the background to simulate a shallower depth of field.Export at Lower ResolutionImage by iamwayclick.At the end of the day, your final export may have to reflect the lower of the two resolutions. If your video is destined for online streaming or social media, this won’t be a big deal and may even reduce file sizes and upload times. If you shot 4K with your digital camera but 720p with your camcorder, you’re probably going to want to export at 720p for best results.Get CreativeImage by Gorodenkoff.However, working with quality footage on a smaller sequence timeline isn’t the end of the world. If you view it with a creative mindset, you’ve actually opened a whole world of possibilities for how to work with your larger-sensor footage to match. You can also consider not exactly matching each format and instead embracing their differences and contrasting their strengths.Here are some creative editing techniques and tricks to consider as inspiration.How to Clean up Noisy Video and Audio in 30 SecondsUnderstanding the Opacity Blend Modes in Adobe Premiere ProWhat Are Contrast Ratios and How Do You Use Them?last_img read more

Read more…

Lateral collateral ligament

first_imgThe lateral collateral ligament connects the end of the femur (thigh) to the top of the fibula (the thin bone that runs next to the shin bone). The lateral collateral ligament provides stability against varus stress. Varus stress is described as a pressure applied to the leg that tries to bend the lower leg sideways at the knee, toward the other leg. Activities such as skiing, football and soccer can all lead to this injury.Review Date:6/13/2010Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; and C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img read more

Read more…

a month agoPotter getting to know Brighton squad through injuries

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Potter getting to know Brighton squad through injuriesby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton manager Graham Potter says he is having to dig deep in his squad this season.Steven Alzate and Aaron Connolly are teenagers who have recently made their debuts as Albion’s injury list includes the likes of Leandro Trossard, Alireza Jahanbakhsh and Leon Balogun.Speaking before Wednesday’s Carabao Cup clash with Aston Villa, Potter said of his squad: “We’re just at the start of working with the group, and that’s the under-23s as well and the whole playing staff here, so the more information we get the better for us – and that’s how we shall look at this game.”We want to, hopefully, be surprised, of course.”He added: “It’s an opportunity to look at the group in its entirety and guys who have not had as much game time as they would like will get the opportunity.”We can also look at some younger players as well to see how they cope in that type of environment against what I think will be a strong Aston Villa side.”Of course, it’s a game you want to win but at the same time we’re in a bit of a heavy period as well with a couple of injuries so we just need to look after the group and make sure we select the right team to be as competitive as we can.” last_img read more

Read more…

Liberals consider amending Arms Trade Treaty bill in face of criticism

first_imgOTTAWA – Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland wants to re-examine Canada’s legislation to join a global arms control treaty after criticism that it gave her too much power, says the Liberal head of the committee studying the bill.Liberal MP Bob Nault said Freeland also wants to take a second look at another heavily criticized portion the bill: that it contains a loophole that could lead to weapons flowing to countries with poor human rights records.The House of Commons foreign affairs committee, which Nault chairs, is studying the bill, which would allow Canada to join the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty aimed at regulating the trade of a wide range of armaments from handguns to tanks.Groups such as Amnesty International have urged the government to amend the bill to close a loophole they say would allow Canada to sell arms to the United States, with no assurances they could not then be transferred to countries that abuse human rights, including Saudi Arabia.Alex Neve, Amnesty’s Canadian secretary general, testified that the proposed bill isn’t strong enough to prevent “diversion” of its U.S.-bound exports to rights abusing countries.He said a recently released U.S. Department of Defence audit found that it could not account for $1 billion worth of U.S. weapons, including tens of thousands of assault rifles, hundreds of mortar rounds and hundreds of armoured vehicles exported to Kuwait and Iraq.Nault said he recently discussed the issue with Freeland and “she’s quite prepared to look at some amendments.”“We’re hearing that people feel we can do a better job, we can do more,” Nault added.Peggy Mason, head of the Rideau Institute think tank, told the committee the bill gives too much discretion to the foreign affairs minister to approve arms exports. Human rights groups say the problem with that was exemplified last year when former foreign affairs minister Stephane Dion approved export permits for a large chunk of the controversial $15-billion sale in light armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia.She said that a “key step in bringing Canada into line with the ATT involves placing hard limits on this discretion.”Nault said a committee meeting set for Thursday was postponed so the government could take a closer look at amendments put forth by the NDP to potentially strengthen the bill.The government didn’t want to use its majority on committee to force passage of the bill, he added.Helene Laverdiere, the New Democrat foreign affairs critic and committee member who proposed amendments, said she is happy with the decision to postpone hearings so the government can contemplate changes.“It’s better than outright refusal,” she said. “But we have to wait to see what they come back with.”The former Conservative government kept Canada out of the UN treaty because it feared it was a back door way to bring back the federal gun registry, which it abolished in 2012 as the fulfillment of a long-standing election promise to its rural base of supporters.Nault said he doesn’t believe the treaty contains any provision that would affect lawful gun ownership in Canada. But he added he is “comfortable we could put some language in there to assure domestic gun owners that this would have no impact on them.”last_img read more

Read more…

US sportswear traced to factory in Chinas internment camps

first_imgHOTAN, China — Barbed wire and hundreds of cameras ring a massive compound of more than 30 dormitories, schools, warehouses and workshops in China’s far west. Dozens of armed officers and a growling Doberman stand guard outside.Behind locked gates, men and women are sewing sportswear that can end up on U.S. college campuses and sports teams.This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately-owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released.The Associated Press has tracked recent, ongoing shipments from one such factory inside an internment camp to Badger Sportswear, a leading supplier in Statesville, North Carolina. The shipments show how difficult it is to stop products made with forced labour from getting into the global supply chain, even though such imports are illegal in the U.S. Badger CEO John Anton said Sunday that the company would source sportswear elsewhere while it investigates.Chinese authorities say the camps, which they call training centres, offer free vocational training for Uighurs, Kazakhs and others, mostly Muslims, as part of a plan to bring minorities into “a modern civilized” world and eliminate poverty in Xinjiang. They say that people in the centres have signed agreements to receive vocational training.The Xinjiang Propaganda Department did not respond to a faxed request for comment. A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman accused the foreign media Monday of making “many untrue reports” about the training centres, but did not specify when asked for details.“Those reports are completely based on hearsay evidence or made out of thin air,” the spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said at a daily briefing.However, a dozen people who either had been in a camp or had friends or family in one told the AP that detainees they knew were given no choice but to work at the factories. Most of the Uighurs and Kazakhs, who were interviewed in exile, also said that even people with professional jobs were retrained to do menial work.Payment varied according to the factory. Some got paid nothing, while others earned up to several hundred dollars a month, they said — barely above minimum wage for the poorer parts of Xinjiang. A person with firsthand knowledge of the situation in one county estimated that more than 10,000 detainees — or 10 to 20 per cent of the internment population there — are working in factories, with some earning just a tenth of what they used to earn before. The person declined to be named out of fear of retribution.A former reporter for Xinjiang TV in exile said that during his month-long detention last year, young people in his camp were taken away in the mornings to work without compensation in carpentry and a cement factory.“The camp didn’t pay any money, not a single cent,” he said, asking to be identified only by his first name, Elyar, because he has relatives still in Xinjiang. “Even for necessities, such as things to shower with or sleep at night, they would call our families outside to get them to pay for it.”Rushan Abbas, a Uighur in Washington, D.C., said her sister is among those detained. The sister, Dr. Gulshan Abbas, was taken to what the government calls a vocational centre, although she has no specific information on whether her sister is being forced to work.“American companies importing from those places should know those products are made by people being treated like slaves,” she said. “What are they going to do, train a doctor to be a seamstress?”___The predominantly Muslim Uighur and Kazakh ethnic minorities in China live mostly in the Xinjiang region bordering Pakistan and Afghanistan, with a legacy dating back to ancient traders on the Silk Road. In recent decades, violent attacks by Uighur militants have killed hundreds and prompted the Chinese government to blanket Xinjiang with stifling security.About two years ago, authorities launched a vast detention and reeducation campaign. They also use checkpoints, GPS tracking and face-scanning cameras for surveillance of ethnic minorities in the region. The slightest perceived misstep can land someone in the internment camps.Men and women in the complex that has shipped products to Badger Sportswear make clothes for privately-owned Hetian Taida Apparel in a cluster of 10 workshops within the compound walls. Hetian Taida says it is not affiliated with the internment camps, but its workforce includes detainees.As China faced growing international pressure about the detention camps, its state broadcaster aired a 15-minute report in October that featured a “vocational skills education and training centre” in the southern Xinjiang city of Hotan.“Terrorism and extremism are the common enemy of human civilization,” the China Central Television program began. In response, the report said, the Xinjiang government was using vocational training to solve this “global issue.”Wu Hongbo, the chairman of Hetian Taida, confirmed that the company has a factory inside the same compound as the training centre featured in the China Central Television report. Hetian Taida provides employment to those trainees who were deemed by the government to be “unproblematic,” he said, adding that the centre is government-operated.“We’re making our contribution to eradicating poverty,” Wu told the AP over the phone.The 20 to 30 trainees at the factory are treated like regular employees and make up a small fraction of the hundreds of people in its workforce, he said.Trainees featured in the state television report praised the Communist Party for saving them from a criminal path.“I don’t dare to imagine what would have happened to me if I didn’t come here,” one Uighur student said. “The party and government found me in time and saved me. They gave me a chance to reinvent myself.”The segment said that in addition to law and Mandarin-language classes, the training centre collaborated with companies to give trainees practical experience. Trainees were shown hunched over sewing machines in a factory whose interior matches that of Hetian Taida’s main Hotan branch, as seen in prior Chinese media reports.Police told the AP journalists who approached the compound earlier this month that they could not take photos or film in the area because it was part of a “military facility.” Yet the entrance was marked only by a tall gate that said it was an “apparel employment training base.”Posters line the barbed-wire perimeter, bearing messages such as “Learn to be grateful, learn to be an upright person” and “No need to pay tuition, find a job easily.”Nathan Ruser, a cyber-policy researcher at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), analyzed satellite images for the AP and found that in Hetian Taida’s case, the apparel factory and the government-run training camp are connected by a fenced path.“There are watchtowers throughout,” Ruser said. “There are clear fences between the buildings and walls that limit movement. Detainees can only access the factories area through walkways, and the entire facility is closed.”The AP could not independently determine if any workers were allowed to come and go, or how much if anything they were paid.At least 10 times this year shipping containers filled with thousands of men’s, women’s and youth polyester knitted T-shirts and pants were sent to Badger Sportswear, a 47-year-old athletic gear seller. The company mostly manufactures in Nicaragua and the U.S., and there is no way to tell where the products from Xinjiang specifically end up. But experts say supply chains are considered tainted by forced labour and modern slavery if even one item was produced by someone forced to work.Sprinkled on the Internet are clues that repeatedly tie the company to the detention camp’s sewing factory floor.Shawn Zhang, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, noted an overlooked Hotan city social media post from February about the first batch of some 1.5 million pieces of clothing worth $400,000 heading overseas from the Hetian Taida Factory. In the middle of a photo of young women flashing the peace sign is Badger Sportswear’s marketing director Ginny Gasswint, who is quoted as saying she’s surprised the workers are “friendly, beautiful, enthusiastic and hardworking.”Badger Sportswear goes to sports teams large and small, ranging from ranging from Charlotte Country Day School Squash team in Charlotte, North Carolina, to Rhode Island’s Coventry Little League and Hansberry College Prep in Chicago, according to its website and advertisements. The AP also found dozens of college bookstores advertising their gear printed on Badger Sportswear, including Texas A&M, University of Pennsylvania, Appalachian State University, University of Northern Iowa, University of Evansville and Bates College. However, it’s impossible to say if any particular shirt is made with forced labour.Badger chief executive Anton said Sunday that his company has sourced products from an affiliate of Hetian Taida for many years. He said about a year ago, the affiliate opened a new factory in western China. Anton confirmed Badger Sportswear officials visited the factory and have a certificate that the factory is certified by social compliance experts.“We will voluntarily halt sourcing and will move production elsewhere while we investigate the matters raised,” he said.Badger Sportswear was acquired by New York investment firm CCMP Capital Advisor in August 2016. Since then, CCMP has acquired three more team sportswear companies, which they are managing under the umbrella of Founder Sport Group.In recent years, Badger imported sportswear — jerseys, T-shirts, workout pants and more — from Nicaragua and Pakistan. But in April this year, it began importing 100 per cent polyester T-shirts and pants from Hetian Taida Apparel, according to U.S. customs data provided by ImportGenius, which analyzes consumer shipments. The address on the shipping records is the same as for the detention camp.The U.S. and United Nations say forced labour is a type of modern slavery, and that items made by people being exploited and coerced to work are banned from import to the U.S.It’s unclear whether other companies also export products made by forced labour in Xinjiang to the U.S., Europe and Asia. The AP found two companies exporting to the U.S. that share approximately the same co-ordinates as places experts have identified as internment camps, and Chinese media reports mention “training” there. But the AP could not confirm whether the companies use forced labour.___The detention camp system is part of China’s increasingly stringent state security under President Xi Jinping. Some detainees told AP earlier this year about beating, solitary confinement and other punishments if they do not recite political songs, names and phrases. The AP has not been given access to these facilities despite repeated attempts to get permission to visit.Not all the camps have forced labour. Many former detainees say they were held in facilities that didn’t have any manufacturing equipment and focused solely on political indoctrination.“They didn’t teach me anything. They were brainwashing me, trying to make us believe how great China is, how powerful it is, how developed its economy is,” said Kairat Samarkan, a Kazakh citizen who said he was tortured with a metal contraption that contorts your body before being released in February after he tried to kill himself.Interviewees described a wave of factory openings earlier this year. Ex-detainee Orynbek Koksebek said that shortly before his release in April, the director strode into his class and announced that a factory would be built in the camp. Koksebek, who cannot speak Mandarin, listened to a policeman as he translated the director’s words into Kazakh for the roughly 90 women and 15 men in the room.“We’re going to open a factory, you’re going to work,” Koksebek recalled him as saying. “We’ll teach you how to cook, how to sew clothes, how to fix cars.”This fall, months after Koksebek’s release, news began trickling into Kazakhstan that the Chinese government was starting forced labour in internment camps and would transfer some detainees out into gated, guarded factories. The workers must live in dormitories on factory grounds. Contact with family ranges from phone calls or in-person visits, to weekends at home under police surveillance.In October, Chinese authorities acknowledged the existence of what they called vocational training centres. State media published an interview with Shohret Zahir, the governor of Xinjiang, saying that “some trainees” were nearly done with their “courses.”“We will try to achieve a seamless connection between school teaching and social employment, so that after finishing their courses, the trainees will be able to find jobs and earn a well-off life,” Zahir said.The forced labour program goes along with a massive government initiative to develop Xinjiang’s economy by constructing enormous factory parks. Another internment camp the AP visited was inside a factory compound called Kunshan Industrial Park, opened under the national anti-poverty push. A local propaganda official, Chen Fang, said workers inside made food and clothes.A hospital, a police station, smokestacks, dormitories and a building with a sign that read “House of Workers” could be seen from outside the surrounding barbed wire fencing. Another section resembled a prison, with guard towers and high walls. The AP did not track any exports from Kunshan to the U.S.Many of those with relatives in such camps said their loved ones were well-educated with high-paying jobs before their arrest, and did not need a poverty alleviation program. Nurbakyt Kaliaskar, a sheepherder’s wife in Kazakhstan, said her daughter, Rezila Nulale, 25, was a college graduate with a well-paid advertising job in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, where she lived a typical urban lifestyle with a computer, a washing machine and an apartment in the city centre.Then last August, after returning from a visit to her family across the border in Kazakhstan, Nulale vanished. She didn’t answer phone calls and stopped showing up to work.Four months later a stranger contacted Kaliaskar online and confirmed her fear: her daughter had been detained for “political training.” The next spring, she said she fainted when two cases of her daughter’s clothes were delivered to her home in Kazakhstan.Last month, Kaliaskar got word via a friend who knows the family that Nulale was working in a factory next to the camp where she had been detained. The friend had heard from Kaliaskar’s brother, who had visited Nulale, bringing medicine for an injured hand.Kaliaskar learned her daughter wasn’t being paid and had to meet a daily quota of three articles of clothing. She couldn’t leave. Her uncle thought she looked pale and thin.“They say they’re teaching her to weave clothes. But the thing is, she’s well educated and had a job,” said Kaliaskar. “What’s the point of this training?”A former detainee, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to protect himself and his family members, said other detainees from his camp also had been forced into jobs at factories far away. They were taken to a government office and handed labour contracts for six months to five years in a distant factory, which they were required to sign.If they ran from the factories, they were warned, they’d be taken straight back to the camps for “further education.”Farmers, herders and manual labourers with little Mandarin and no higher education say they appreciated Beijing’s past initiatives to help the poor, including subsidized housing and the installation of electricity and running water. But the camps, the forced education, and the factories, they say, go too far.“I never asked the government to find work for my husband,” said Mainur Medetbek, whose husband did odd repair jobs before vanishing into a camp in February during a visit to China from their home in Kazakhstan.She has been able to glean a sense of his conditions from monitored exchanges with relatives and from the husband of a woman who is in the same camp. He works in an apparel factory and is allowed to leave and spend the night with relatives every other Saturday. Though she’s not certain how much her husband makes, the woman in his camp earns 600 yuan (about $87) a month, less than half the local minimum wage and far less than what Medetbek’s husband used to earn.Since her husband was detained, Medetbek and her children have had no reliable source of income and sometimes go hungry. The ordeal has driven her to occasionally contemplate suicide.“They say it’s a factory, but it’s an excuse for detention. They don’t have freedom, there’s no time for him to talk with me,” she said. “They say they found a job for him. I think it’s a concentration camp.”___Martha Mendoza reported from Santa Cruz, California.Dake Kang, Martha Mendoza And Yanan Wang, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Read more…

City holding public meeting to review 2017 Annual Report with residents Monday

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The City of Fort St. John is inviting residents to ask questions and give feedback during a public meeting next Monday when the City’s 2017 Annual Report will be released.The 75-page document highlights the City’s accomplishments and whether goals were met in 2017 as well as its goals for this year. The report also includes the City’s 2017 audited financial statements and a report on permissive property taxes.Copies of the report are available via this link: http://www.fortstjohn.ca/node/27966, or can be picked up at City Hall. The Council Chambers at City Hall will be the venue for the public meeting, which is taking place at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, June 25th.last_img read more

Read more…

World Jet Boat Championships day four results

first_imgXcalibur GRANDE PRAIRIE, AB – The fourth-day results of the 2019 World Jet Boat Championships results are in.Local racers from the Peace Country River Rats and their times include;Unnatural Disaster  Gord Humphrey and navigator Jason Palfy No. 357 Unlimited Race Times: 02:11:22Currently ranked 4th position in the divisioncenter_img  Stacy Kelm and navigator Ty Wheat No. 195 CX Race Times: 02:58:20Currently ranked 7th position in the divisionLeroy Trapper Wolsey and navigator Jimmy Jackson No. 151 CX Race Times: 03:13:20Currently ranked 9th position in the divisionDirty Harry Clayton Wolsey and navigator Ryley Tschiedel No. 152 CX Race Times: 03:15:56Currently ranked 10th position in the divisionThe 2019 World Jet Boat Championships started in Whitecourt, travelling along the Peace River, and finish up with the last leg in Taylor on July 20 to the 21, 2019.More information on the 2019 World Jet Boat Championships; CLICK HERElast_img read more

Read more…

I am not feeling disappointed Tara on mixed reviews for SOTY 2

first_imgMumbai: Actor Tara Sutaria is not disappointed with the mixed reviews that her maiden Bollywood film Student Of The Year 2 (SOTY) has received from the critics and audience. SOTY 2, directed by Punit Malhotra and starring Tiger Shroff and Ananya Panday apart from Tara, released on Friday. It made Rs 12.06 crore on its opening day and Rs 14.02 crore on Saturday. The story is about a hardworking college student (Tiger) who overcomes his personal challenges and faces his competitors to win the Student of the Year Cup. Its script and unreal situations have drawn criticism. Also Read – ‘Terminator: Dark Fate’ has James Cameron’s fingerprints all over it: Arnold SchwarzeneggerAsked if she was disappointed, Tara told the media: “I am not feeling disappointed, but I am feeling really happy that it has been accepted so well. I think what we envisioned for the film, according to that, we feel lucky and thankful that it has opened so well at the box office. The entire team of SOTY 2 is very happy and I would like to make an appeal to the audience that keep giving us the love that you have been giving us.” Tara spoke on the sidelines of an event. Also Read – Salman pays tribute to Vinod Khanna on ‘Dabangg 3’ wrap upOn the big screen, the actor will next be seen in Milan Lutheria’s film RX 100 along with Ahan Shetty, the son of actor Suniel Shetty. They are still training for the film. “I am very excited to start shooting for it. I think Ahan is fantastic and so is Tiger. Therefore, I feel very lucky that I am getting an opportunity to work with such talented actors from the film industry,” she said. RX 100 is the official remake of the Telugu action thriller film of the same name. The film is slated to go on the floors in July and will be shot in Mussoorie, apart from a brief schedule at a studio in Mumbai.last_img read more

Read more…

Michigan born OSU hockey forward Nick Schilkey wears scarlet and gray close

OSU junior forward Nick Schilkey (7) during a game against Michigan on May. 6 at Nationwide Arena. Credit: Lantern File PhotoOhio State senior forward hockey captain Nick Schilkey wishes he had a dollar for every time he has been asked why he came to OSU from his home state of Michigan. If so, he said he would be as rich as another Buckeye: L Brands owner Les Wexner. The constant questioning will be worth it, however, if Schilkey is successful in his pursuit of a Big Ten championship and the program’s first berth into the NCAA tournament since 2009.  A native of Marysville, Michigan, Schilkey grew up playing in the Detroit area primarily with the nationally recognized HoneyBaked AAA program. It was his parents, Glen and Michelle, along with his other family ties that instilled the love for the game of hockey in him.“My dad always joked that he put me in skates before I could walk.” Schilkey said.His speed and agility — which led him to score 87 goals and assist on 85 others between the ages of 13 and 16 against NHL players Alex Galchenyuk of the Montreal Canadiens and Jacob Trouba of the Winnipeg Jets — caught the attention of OSU.It was not until his final year with HoneyBaked in 2010-11 that he realized college hockey was a legitimate option.“I don’t think I could ever look back at one of those teams and thinking to myself as being one of the best guys because we were so good,” Schilkey said.OSU was the first school to approach Schilkey about furthering his career in hockey. The program’s commitment to Schilkey, facilities and campus life sold him immediately, he said.“I go to different schools around the country and play and nothing beats what we have here,” Schilkey said. “I came down here and the coaches really wanted me to be here and I wanted to be here. This was the spot for me.”Before he moved to Columbus, Schilkey played junior hockey for two years, a common prerequisite for hockey players before beginning their college endeavors.After two seasons with the Green Bay Gamblers of the United States Hockey League, the top junior league in the U.S., Schilkey was ready to showcase his talents at OSU.The team he was recruited by, however, had changed by the time he arrived. In April 2013, OSU coach Mark Osiecki was fired and replaced by Steve Rohlik, who had been an Osiecki assistant.Schilkey was not deterred.“I was comfortable with the coaches because (Rohlik) was here,” Schilkey said. “For me, I didn’t think anything would change too much.”Rohlik recalled the recruitment of Schilkey, who stood out like maize and blue in a sea of scarlet and gray.“When you walked into the rink, you knew who Nick Schilkey was,” Rohlik said. “He’d get that puck and he’d be Mach 10 down the ice. He could score. One thing that always grabbed me is that he wanted it. He wanted the puck, he wanted to be involved, he wanted to be ‘the guy.’ There was no hesitation in his game.”Rohlik has continued to be impressed by Schilkey’s performances weekend after weekend.“You know what you’re getting when he touches the ice,” Rohlik said. “I know if I throw him out there, he’s going to give me everything that he’s got.”And it shows in his production, Rohlik said.In 108 career games, Schilkey has 43 goals and 48 assists. He has been voted team captain twice due to leadership that has rubbed off on his teammates.“Right away freshman year, I noticed that he never quits,” senior defenseman Josh Healey said. “He goes out there every shift and every time in the weight room and goes until he can’t go anymore. It really pushed me to be my best when I was around him … He’s a leader by example and guys follow that, it’s a credit to him.”So far this season, the team has followed him to an upset win over No. 3 Denver last Friday on its home ice, followed by a tie with Air Force the next night. As the Buckeyes head into the heart of the 2016-17 season, Rohlik said there is no one he would trust more to lead the team.“I think it’s in him right now that he wants to do something special before he leaves here,” Rohlik said. “He’s already had such a huge impact on this program, not only by being a great player, but by being a great person. I can’t say enough about him. He’s one of those guys, as a coach, you love having him in your program.” As for Schilkey, the legacy he wants to leave behind is a championship in his home state. The conference tournament will be hosted at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit for the final time in March.“To get this team back there and obviously it’s going to take a lot of leaders in the room, it’s going to take the team to accomplish that goal,” Schilkey said. “I think we’re excited for it. I think we’re confident in that this is one of the best opportunities we’ve had in my four years here. To leave on top is something everybody wants to do.”Ranked No. 19 in the latest uscho.com poll, Schilkey and the Buckeyes head to Oxford, Ohio, on Saturday to take on in-state rival Miami at Goggin Ice Center with the puck drop scheduled for 8:05 p.m. read more

Read more…

Commentary Would US sports fans support promotion relegation system

When a professional sports team in America has a bad season, as the old saying goes, there’s always next season – but not in European soccer. End-of-season discussions around some European professional soccer leagues are about survival. Mainly, which teams are going to survive to play another year in a given country’s top league. The English Premier League, the world’s most prominent soccer league, is among those leagues where suspense almost always carries into the final minutes of the season. The EPL has a stipulation in place that relegates or downgrades its bottom three teams in any one season to the Football Association’s Championship division. In return, the top three teams of the Championship are promoted to the Premier League. Conceptually, it would be like the Columbus Clippers having the best record in Triple-A baseball and then moving up to play Major League Baseball the following season. And the same goes for the Championship, as well as the two divisions below it – the FA’s League One and League Two. The top and bottom three teams from each of England’s four divisions shuffle back and forth season after season. With its season concluding on Sunday, this year’s EPL relegated teams are Wolverhampton F.C., Blackburn F.C. and Bolton F.C. No club is safe from the relegation rule as Blackburn (1995 EPL Champions) becomes the first former Premier League champion to be relegated. How harsh is that? 17 years removed from a championship and you’re deemed not good enough to compete in the league. Harsh or not, the rule is ingenious on some levels. It creates a level playing field and makes every game in a season matter. There certainly isn’t any talk of “tanking” game in the Premier League for any reason. So, what if American sports leagues adopted its European counterparts relegation and promotion rules? Would it be a good thing? Is it even possible? Would the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats have lost 23 games in a row to end the season? Whether it would be good for leagues like the NFL, MLB, NBA and the NHL to adopt the relegation-promotion rule is purely subjective. It would be good in the sense teams likely wouldn’t tank, and every regular-season game matters, but at what cost? Would the playoffs have to be eliminated? The EPL crowns its champion based solely on regular season performance. If there were no Super Bowl or World Series, would that be a good thing? The question of whether it’s even possible to have a relegation-promotion rule in American professional sports is interesting. As it stands now, only two of the top four leagues have the type of minor-league system in place to piggyback off the system used English soccer. The NHL has the American Hockey League (AHL) below it as an incremental level and MLB has Triple-A baseball with the International League and Pacific Coast League. Even then, those leagues would need adjustment. The NHL or MLB teams couldn’t have ties to the AHL or Triple-A teams as they do now using the lower level teams as a means of producing players within a farm system. The Premier League’s relegation and promotion rule is something American sports fans envy, and although some fans wish it would be adopted tomorrow by America’s sports leagues, it’s not a simple as it may seem. read more

Read more…

Undefeated Ohio State football finishes 120 in Urban Meyers first season

For all intents and purposes, the 2012 Ohio State football senior class is gone, never to wear scarlet and gray in meaningful competition again. “It’s almost like you’re losing some of your children when they go away to college,” said first-year OSU coach Urban Meyer after the team’s season-ending win against Michigan on Saturday. “Our house is going to be empty.” Gone? Perhaps, but not to be soon forgotten. After all, it was the contributions of the seniors that made the team’s run at perfection a possibility. Behind the strength of many of those 21 departing seniors, the No. 4-ranked Buckeyes (12-0, 8-0 Big Ten) clinched the sixth undefeated and untied season in program history and the first since 2002 Saturday with a 26-21 win against archrival Michigan (8-4, 6-2 Big Ten) at Ohio Stadium. The 109th edition of The Game saw OSU, the Big Ten’s Leaders Division champions, claim its 44th win against the Wolverines. UM, eliminated from Big Ten title contention after Nebraska beat Iowa on Friday, still owns the all-time series advantage with a 58-44-6 record. With Saturday being the final game of the season due to the NCAA-imposed postseason ban, one thing was evident within minutes of the final whistle following victory against UM – no more seniors. Meyer handed out several “thank you’s” during his postgame remarks, but the biggest thank you went out to those whose eligibility is up, players like Zach Boren, Etienne Sabino and John Simon. Theirs was an effort worthy of remembrance, Meyer said, and he plans to ensure that their memory doesn’t fade away. “I’m going to see to it when you walk into that Woody Hayes (Athletic Center) this team will never be forgotten, because they deserve that,” he said. It’s not hard to imagine why Meyer feels so strongly. Boren switched positions midseason, jumping from offense to defense when he left the fullback spot to join a depleted line backing corps. Boren hadn’t played linebacker since high school but, in just six games, he tallied 50 tackles, including a team-high nine in the win against UM. One of those tackles was a bone-jarring sack of Wolverines junior quarterback Devin Gardner. Boren stood above Gardner after the hit, shouting and rattling his face mask just above Gardner’s. Sabino broke his leg during OSU’s Oct. 6 win against Nebraska but returned in time to join the team for its divisional-clinching win against Wisconsin on Nov. 17, as well as the game against the Wolverines. The redshirt senior linebacker said the 2012 season was indeed a dream. “I wouldn’t want it to end any other way,” he said. And there was Simon, a defensive end and the team’s emotional leader throughout the perfect campaign. Simon missed Saturday’s Senior Day activities, as well as the game itself, with a right knee injury sustained one week prior against Wisconsin. “John Simon – the heart and soul of who we are as the 2012 football team,” Meyer said. Simon was not made available for comment following the game. There were other major contributors from the senior class, relatively unheralded compared to Boren, Sabino and Simon, but whose contributions likely went just as far in helping the team achieve an undefeated season. OSU redshirt senior punter Ben Buchanan walked off the Ohio Stadium field for the final time at peace with what he gave to the program. His final play was a 41-yard punt that pinned UM on its 8-yard line with less than 10 minutes to play in the game. Given the moment, Buchanan said, the punt was as good as it gets. “I think this team will be remembered as a very unselfish team, a team that really had to come together with some tough circumstances, there’s no doubting that,” Buchanan said. “I was proud of the way these guys just rallied and, they did, we just refused to lose and to be a senior on this team was truly on honor.” Sensing that he wouldn’t fit in Meyer’s offensive system, OSU senior Reid Fragel went to his then-newly hired coach and volunteered to switch from tight end to right tackle. For his selfless act, Fragel was plunged into a preseason battle for playing time with freshman Taylor Decker, which Fragel later won. Months later, Fragel attempted to address his teammates in the locker room following the season-ending win against the Wolverines. He struggled to articulate he feelings. “I wanted to thank (my teammates) and, really, tell them how I feel about this whole year, but it’s hard to put words to this season we’ve had,” Fragel said. “It’s something out of a movie … Just to see us come out 12-0, beating Michigan, that’s something I couldn’t have wrote up before the game.” As Buchanan and his teammates enjoyed the climactic day of the season, OSU football converged with its troubled past as former coach Jim Tressel, the man responsible for the 2012 team’s postseason ban, returned. Once shamed by the “Tattoo-Gate” scandal in which he knowingly fielded a team of ineligible players during the 2010 season, Tressel was hoisted onto the shoulders of players from his 2002 national championship team, which was honored for the 10-year reunion of its great feat between the first and second quarters. But with Tressel came memories of his unceremonious exit from the university – he was forced to resign in May 2011 – as well as the Buckeyes’ agonizing 2011 campaign where they posted a 6-7 record. The loudest cheers during Saturday’s short, in-game ceremony for the 2002 team came during the moments that featured Tressel, the man that each member of the 2012 senior class signed on to play for. Louder still were the cheers for the current players themselves, now under Meyer’s direction, during actual game action, and particularly when the clock struck “00:00.” Meyer will hold a “season wrap-up” press conference on Monday, according to an OSU athletics release. The Buckeyes will then turn the page on the 2012 season and set their sights on 2013. “After our team meeting on Tuesday, we start a new journey,” Meyer said. The strong foundation that has been laid at OSU exists because of the 21 dedicated Buckeyes that hung up their pads and cleats for the final time on Saturday. For those seniors who won’t rejoin the Scarlet and Gray in pursuit of championship glory, their last gasp as active members of the Buckeye Brotherhood couldn’t have been sweeter. “It’s unbelievable, man, I couldn’t ask for anything more other than a chance to play a couple more weeks,” said OSU redshirt senior defensive lineman Nathan Williams. “This is how the 2012 team is going to be remembered by, you know, going undefeated … going 12-0 and beating Michigan at home. I really wouldn’t want to go out any other way than that.” read more

Read more…

Russias progress in the World Cup is well deserved

first_imgMundial host Russia has beaten all the nations it has played against but progress for them to the World Cup last-16 is the victory the country deserves, the country’s Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu said on Thursday via FourFourTwo.Russia won their opening two matches at the tournament, humiliating Saudi Arabia with five goals and thrashing Egypt 3-1, to secure them a slot in the latter stages of the competition for the first time since the break-up of the Soviet Union.ScotlandScotland needs a hero: Billy Dodds Manuel R. Medina – September 10, 2019 According to former striker, Billy Dodds his country needs a hero to inspire future generations as the team’s hope to qualify to the EURO 2020 is small.“Our win, of course, is pleasing. This is huge. It is a great event for the country, because we deserve victories as we have done a lot for this. Because the country has built a large number of stadiums in such a short period of time. These are beautiful, stunning buildings,” Shoigu told journalists.He added that football was a great game, which unites those who love sports and their country and those “who value normal relations between other countries, states and peoples.”last_img read more

Read more…