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Jet Blue adds four Caribbean routes

first_img 75 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Share BusinessLifestyleTravel Jet Blue adds four Caribbean routes by: – May 2, 2014center_img Tweet Share JetBlue’s major Caribbean expansion continued on Thursday with the launch of four new routes to the region.The New York City-based carrier began nonstop service from the US to destinations including Montego Bay, Jamaica, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Punta Cana and Santiago in the Dominican Republic.The new nonstop service included Newark-Santiago, Fort Lauderdale-Montego Bay, Fort Lauderdale-Port of Spain and Fort Lauderdale-Punta Cana.“We now offer customers 69 nonstop routes from the US to the Caribbean and more than 200 daily flights to, from and within the Caribbean, which is more than any other airline,” said JetBlue President Robin Hayes. “We will continue to expand our presence in this region to better connect families and friends, create international business opportunities and bring Americans to the wonderful leisure destinations across the Caribbean.”JetBlue has been on a significant growth drive in the Caribbean region, out of New York, Fort Lauderdale and its “focus city” of San Juan, Puerto Rico.Its expansion has helped soften the blow caused by the departure of American Eagle last year, and the carrier seems to have a number of other new destinations in mind as well.Caribbean Journallast_img read more

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Wimbledon 2019: Roger Federer admits final defeat is one he would rather forget

first_imgAt 8-7 in the deciding set, Federer led 40-15 on his own serve but could not see out victory.The match became the first Wimbledon final to go to a tie-break at 12-12 in the decider before Djokovic claimed his fifth championship after four hours and 57 minutes. Related News Roger Federer said he would “try to forget” his Wimbledon final defeat to Novak Djokovic after failing to take two match points.The eight-time champion fell agonizingly short of a ninth title, losing 7-6 (7-5) 1-6 7-6 (7-4) 4-6 13-12 (7-3) on Centre Court on Sunday in the longest final in history at the All England Club. Wimbledon 2019: Simona Halep no longer intimidated by Serena Williams “I hope I give some other people a chance to believe that at 37 it’s not over yet,” said Federer.”I feel great. It’s going to take some time to recover, physically too. But I gave it my all, I’m still standing, and I wish the same for all the other 37-year-olds.”His family came out to see the presentations, and Federer said: “They won’t be excited with the plate (the prize for finishing runner-up). They’d rather take that golden thing. I love them. It’s back to being Dad and husband, it’s all good.”center_img Federer said: “I will try to forget, but it was a great match. … It was long, it had everything. I had my chances; so did he. I thought we played some great tennis.”I’m very happy with my performance. But Novak, that was great, congratulations man, that was crazy.”“At 37, it’s not over yet!”For @rogerfederer, the pursuit of more Grand Slam glory continues…#Wimbledon pic.twitter.com/Y1o1b1tjf4— Wimbledon (@Wimbledon) July 14, 2019Federer, 37, will regret that 16th game of the final set for a long time, but his longevity continues to amaze.He suggested this will not be his final challenge for a 21st grand slam triumph, even though he turns 38 next month. Wimbledon 2019: Novak Djokovic outlasts Roger Federer in record-breaking match to defend titlelast_img read more

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Pope prays during visit to Auschwitz

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2 “In a place like this, words fail; in the end, there can be only a dread silence, a silence which itself is a heartfelt cry to God: Why, Lord, did you remain silent? How could you tolerate all this?” Benedict said that just as his predecessor, John Paul II visited the camp as a Pole in 1979, he came as “a son of the German people.” “The rulers of the Third Reich wanted to crush the entire Jewish people, to cancel it from the register of the peoples of the Earth,” he said, standing near the demolished crematoriums where the Nazis burned the bodies of their victims. “By destroying Israel with the Shoah, they ultimately wanted to tear up the taproot of the Christian faith and to replace it with a faith of their own invention.” Shoah is the Hebrew term for the Holocaust, during which the Nazis killed 6 million Jews. OSWIECIM, Poland – Pope Benedict XVI visited the Auschwitz concentration camp as “a son of the German people” Sunday and asked God why he remained silent during the “unprecedented mass crimes” of the Holocaust. Benedict walked along the row of plaques at the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex’s memorial, one in the language of each nationality whose members died there. As he stopped to pray, a light rain stopped and a brilliant rainbow appeared over the camp. “To speak in this place of horror, in this place where unprecedented mass crimes were committed against God and man, is almost impossible – and it is particularly difficult and troubling for a Christian, for a pope from Germany,” he said later. “A dread silence” As many as 1.5 million people, most of them Jews, died at Auschwitz and Birkenau, neighboring camps built by the German occupiers near the Polish town of Oswiecim – Auschwitz in German. Others who died there included Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, Roma – or Gypsies, and political opponents of the Nazis. Focus on Nazis Benedict did not refer to collective guilt of the German people but instead focused on the Nazi regime. He said he was “a son of that people over which a ring of criminals rose to power by false promises of future greatness.” He also did not mention the controversy over the wartime role of Pope Pius XII, who some say did not do all in his power to prevent Jews from being deported to concentration camps. The Vatican rejects that accusation. Typically, Benedict did not mention his own personal experiences during the war. Raised by his anti-Nazi father, Benedict was enrolled in the Hitler Youth as a teenager against his will and then was drafted into the German army in the last months of the war. He wrote in his memoirs that he decided to desert in the war’s last days in 1945 and returned to his home in Traunstein in Bavaria, risking summary execution if caught. In the book, he recounted his terror at being briefly stopped by two soldiers. Held as prisoner He was then held for several weeks as a prisoner of war by U.S. forces who occupied his hometown. Earlier, the white-clad Benedict walked alone under the camp gate containing the notorious words: “Arbeit Macht Frei,” or “Work Sets You Free.” He stopped for a full minute before the Wall of Death, where the Nazis killed thousands of prisoners. He was handed a lighted candle, which he placed before the wall. At the Wall of Death, a line of 32 elderly camp survivors awaited Benedict, most of them Catholic. He moved slowly down the line, stopping to talk with each, taking one woman’s face in his hands and kissing one of the men on both cheeks. Benedict then visited the dark cell in the basement of one of the buildings, the place where St. Maximilian Kolbe, a Polish Franciscan friar, was executed after voluntarily taking the place of a condemned prisoner with a large family in 1941. Kolbe was canonized by John Paul II in 1982. The visit is heavy with significance for Roman Catholic-Jewish relations, a favorite theme for Benedict and John Paul. This was the third time Benedict has visited Auschwitz and the neighboring camp at Birkenau. The first was in 1979, when he accompanied John Paul, and in 1980, when he came with a group of German bishops while he was archbishop of Munich. A shadow was cast over the papal visit by Saturday’s attack on Poland’s chief rabbi, Michael Schudrich, who was to say Kaddish, or the Jewish prayer for the dead, during the ceremony led by the pope. Schudrich told The Associated Press he was attacked in central Warsaw after confronting a man who shouted at him, “Poland for Poles!” The rabbi said the unidentified man punched him in the chest and sprayed him with what appeared to be pepper spray. He was not injured. Schudrich said the most important part of Benedict’s message “was his physical presence at Auschwitz” but that some Jews wished he had gone further by directly addressing anti-Semitism. Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center, told The Associated Press that Benedict’s presence at the camp and his remarks were firm reminders that Holocaust deniers were not speaking the truth. “He wore the uniform of the Hitler Youth. For him to now go there as the pope and acknowledge the horrors the Holocaust visited on the Jewish people and all mankind is important.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! 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Disorder left ancient human relative with teeth pocked like golf balls

first_imgIan Towle Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Disorder left ancient human relative with teeth pocked like golf balls By Michael PriceMar. 7, 2019 , 9:40 AM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email However, these defects probably didn’t come from P. robustus’s diet. The condition closely resembles a somewhat rare modern genetic disorder called amelogenesis imperfecta that affects about one in 1000 people worldwide, the researchers report this week in the Journal of Human Evolution. The disorder causes a breakdown in enamel-producing cells, leading to scattered pits and grooves in the teeth.How did P. robustus develop this condition? In modern humans, the genes responsible also contribute to thick, dense enamel. It’s possible, the researchers suggest, that the defect was a side effect of evolving thicker, denser teeth to cope with the species’s rough diet. Add this to your list of nightmare jobs: prehistoric dentist. Had the profession existed 1.8 million years ago, it would have encountered an ancient human relative with a disconcertingly common dental disorder: weakened, pockmarked teeth resembling the surface of a golf ball.The patient in question is Paranthropus robustus, a massive-jawed, thick-molared creature that looked a bit like a gorilla and feasted on tropical grasses, hard seeds and nuts, and fibrous fruits in southern Africa. Scientists have long suspected P. robustus’s tough, gritty diet contributed to the overall poor condition of the species’s fossil teeth found over the years.Hoping to learn more, paleontologists compared hundreds of fossilized P. robustus teeth, pictured above, with those of other southern African hominins such as Australopithecus sediba and A. africanus that lived at roughly the same time, as well as with more recent hominins and living apes. The golf ball–like pitting was a common feature of P. robustus teeth, showing up in 47% of baby teeth and 14% of permanent teeth of the species, whereas it occurred only in about 7% and 4%, respectively, of the baby and permanent teeth of the other ancient hominins combined. These pits in the teeth enamel would have made them wear down quickly and break easily.last_img read more

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