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Mr. Larry Dean Buchanan

first_imgMr. Larry Dean Buchanan, age 75, of Columbus, Indiana, formerly of Switzerland County, Indiana, entered this life on May 31, 1942, at home in Ohio County, Indiana, the son of the late, Wilbur Russell “Toots” and Elizabeth Melzena (Bovard) Buchanan. He was raised in Quercus Grove, Indiana and was a 1960 graduate of the Patriot High School. Larry was inducted into the United States Navy on October 25, 1961, in Cincinnati, Ohio, serving during the Vietnam War. He earned the good conduct medal and was honorably discharged with the rank of AK2 on February 24, 1966, in Memphis, Tennessee. Larry was united in marriage on January 22, 1992 in Columbus, Indiana to Brenda Teltoe and to this union arrived a daughter Emilee to bless their home. Larry was employed as a mail carrier for the US Postal Service in Columbus, Indiana, retiring in 1997, after 30 years of service. He was a member of the Columbus Moose Lodge #398. Larry enjoyed coaching softball for many years, golfing and was a Cincinnati Reds fan. Larry passed away at 12:24 a.m., Thursday, March 1, 2018, at his residence in Columbus, Indiana. Larry is survived by his daughter, Emilee L. Andrew and her husband: Dylan of Columbus, IN; his dog, Zoe; his brother-in-law, Kenny Griffin of Vevay, IN and his several nieces and nephews.He was preceded in death by his parents, Wilbur Russell “Toots” Buchanan, died March 21, 1991 and Elizabeth Melsena (Bovard) Buchanan, died November 17, 1993; his brother, Jim R. Buchanan, died December 3, 2000 and his sister, Verlie Griffin, died September 8, 2012.A celebration of Larry’s life will be held on Saturday, March 10, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., at the Hartsville United Methodist Church, 175 Jaskson Street Hartsville, Indiana 47244.Memorial contributions may be made to Our Hospice of South Central Indiana. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more

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MLAX : Marasco, Palasek fuel SU’s recent offensive turnaround

first_imgIn front of the Notre Dame goal, JoJo Marasco spun relentlessly to try and get free. With two Fighting Irish defenders hounding him down the right alley, Marasco sprinted toward the goal line.There, he spun back once more and found Stephen Keogh. End of sentence.‘When given the opportunity, Stephen Keogh is automatic at finishing,’ said Zach Babo, a staff writer for Inside Lacrosse, in a phone interview. ‘… Keogh is the end-of-the-sentence kind of guy. He is going to finish what the rest of the offense is going to generate.’Keogh’s goal against the Irish represented a new wrinkle in No. 1 SU’s offensive scheme that has propelled the team to four straight wins. Ever since attack Tim Desko injured his knee against Princeton, Tom Palasek has played — and played very well — in his spot. It has allowed the Orange (13-1, 5-0 Big East) to adjust its lineup so that it has a dominant dodger on either side of the goal on offense. Palasek has commanded the attack from behind the goal for the most part, while Marasco has thrived in front of it as the fourth attack or a midfielder.Babo called Palasek and Marasco ‘quarterbacks’ of the Syracuse attack. And the ability to have one of them running the offense from behind the goal and the other out front has invigorated a once-dreary Orange attack.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse has averaged more than 12 goals per game in its four wins since losing to then-No. 5 Cornell on April 12.‘You kind of have that dodging, great-vision quarterback above the cage and that dodging, great-vision quarterback behind the cage,’ Babo said.‘It’s a very difficult thing to defend for defenses because they have two different guys that can feed them the ball.’Marasco and Palasek have thrived as distributors of late and added a punch to head coach John Desko’s offense. During Syracuse’s four-game winning streak, the pair has handed out 11 assists combined.Three of those 11 have gone to Keogh, whose production has improved with the additional playmaker in the lineup. He netted four goals Saturday in SU’s 11-8 upset of then-No. 1 Notre Dame — a performance that drew praise from Irish head coach Kevin Corrigan.‘I think he hurt us when we didn’t slide off of him, and I think he hurt us when we did,’ Corrigan said. ‘That’s a pretty good player right there.’In addition to superior field vision, Palasek and Marasco bring speed to the Syracuse lineup. Against a Notre Dame defensive unit that boasted an average height of 6-foot-3 among its starters, their quickness posed problems. Something illustrated in Marasco’s ability to shed two Irish defenders and find Keogh streaking toward the crease for the catch-and-shoot goal.In all, Marasco and Palasek played a hand in five of the Orange’s 11 goals. In a 12-2 win over Rutgers on April 23, they were involved in eight of 12.‘I feel like when we’re moving and our spacing is right, the speed really helps us out,’ Palasek said. ‘So if we can play fast out there, it’s tough for any guy out on the field to stay with us.’It’s a duo that Babo feels could hold the key to SU’s postseason chances, especially considering the type of player that Keogh is. The senior from Canada is much more likely to move off the ball and get open for a shot than he is to create one for himself. So if Marasco and Palasek can continue to orchestrate the offense at a high level, the Orange’s success will continue, too.‘(Keogh’s) production is so much an end result of the way the rest of Syracuse is clicking on a given day,’ Babo said.And in a game that was thought to be a defensive struggle between two of the stingiest units in the country, Syracuse’s ability to click and make plays was the difference. The Orange attack used its agility and lateral quickness to find the creases in the Notre Dame defense and exploit the Irish for 11 goals — two more than the unit had given up in a single game this season coming into the weekend.And the front-back combination of Marasco and Palasek, respectively, was one big reason.‘I thought our middies had some good looks down low,’ Desko said. ‘And then when they started covering us up down low, we were able to move the ball back up top.‘I thought we were moving off the ball, and anytime you’re moving like that it’s harder to cover people off the ball.’mjcohe02@syr.edu Published on May 2, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Michael: mjcohe02@syr.edu | @Michael_Cohen13 Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

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Anesthesia drug ketamine may fight depression by muzzling bursting brain cells

first_imgRats given ketamine have fewer rapid-firing neurons in their brain’s “anti–reward center.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Kevin Link/Science Source Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Matt WarrenFeb. 14, 2018 , 1:00 PMcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Anesthesia drug ketamine may fight depression by muzzling ‘bursting’ brain cells The anesthesia medication ketamine has shown promise in treating depression, but its exact effects on the brain are unclear. Now, researchers have discovered that the drug changes the firing patterns of cells in a pea-size structure hidden away in the center of the brain. This could explain why ketamine is able to relieve symptoms of depression so quickly—and may provide a fresh target for scientists developing new antidepressants.“It’s a spectacular study,” says Roberto Malinow, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego, who was not involved in the work. “It will make a lot of people think.”In clinical trials, ketamine appears to act much faster than existing antidepressants, improving symptoms within hours rather than weeks. “People have tried really hard to figure out why it’s working so fast, because understanding this could perhaps lead us to the core mechanism of depression,” says Hailan Hu, a neuroscientist at Zhejiang University School of Medicine in Hangzhou, China, and a senior author on the new study. Hu suspected the drug might target a tiny region in the middle of the brain called the lateral habenula, the so-called “anti–reward center.” This region inhibits nearby reward areas, which can be useful in learning; for example, if a monkey pulls a lever expecting a treat but never receives it, the lateral habenula will reduce the activity of reward areas, and the monkey will be less likely to pull the lever in the future. But research over the past decade has suggested that the area may be overactive in depression, dampening down those reward centers too much.In a series of experiments using mouse and rat models of depression reported today in Nature, Hu and her colleagues found that ketamine did affect the lateral habenula—but it was the pattern of firing, rather than the overall amount of activity, that proved crucial. A small proportion of the neurons in the lateral habenula fire several times in quick bursts, rather than firing once at regular intervals; the team found that “depressed” rodents had a lot more of these quick burst cells. In brain slices from normal rats, only about 7% of cells were the bursting type, but in rats bred to display depressionlike behavior, the number was 23%.Direct recordings from the neurons of live mice showed the same pattern: Animals that had gone through a stressful procedure had more bursting cells in the lateral habenula. And, importantly, this bursting behavior appeared to cause depressionlike states. When researchers used optogenetics—a technique that allows cells to be switched on and off with light—to increase the amount of bursting in the lateral habenula, mice behaved in a more “depressed” way, remaining motionless when forced to swim in a container of water, for example. This kind of despair is thought to be similar to the feelings of hopelessness experienced in depression.When “depressed” mice and rats were given ketamine, the number of bursting cells was much lower, similar to the number in normal animals, Hu’s team found. And even when the researchers forced the neurons to fire in bursts, animals that had been given ketamine no longer showed depressionlike behaviors.Hu says that neurons firing several times in quick succession produce a more powerful signal. This means that bursting cells may be sending particularly strong messages to dampen down activity in reward areas, which could lead to depression. “Bursting has a special kind of signaling power,” Malinow says. “You get more bang for your buck.”The findings could also explain why ketamine acts so quickly. By immediately blocking bursts in the lateral habenula, the drug releases the reward areas from those strong signals. This suggests that other drugs that reduce burst firing could also alleviate depression, whether they act on the same receptors or different ones. “Anything that can block the bursting … should be a potential target based on our model,” Hu says. In an accompanying paper, her team reports that a protein found on astrocytes, another type of brain cell that interacts closely with neurons, could be one of these targets.Panos Zanos, a neuropharmacologist at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, says the immediate effects of the drug in the lateral habenula were interesting. “I’m very excited … to see whether this [also] applies to the long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine,” he says. “This is a great study that adds to the literature on how ketamine might work.”last_img read more

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