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Area Baseball Regionals Results

first_imgWRBI Area Baseball Regional Scores.Class 3A @ Jasper.Gibson Southern  1     Batesville  0Silver Creek  2     Southridge  1Championship:  Gibson Southern  16     Silver Creek  4Class 1A @ Morristown.Jac-Cen-Del  5     Indy Lutheran  2Shakamak  10     Greenwood Christian Academy  0Championship:  Shakamak  10     Jac-Cen-Del  2Courtesy of The IHSAA.last_img

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Honda shuts down through May 1

first_imgGreensburg, IN—Honda Manufacturing of North America that includes the Greensburg plant is now suspending production through May 1st due to a reported 50% drop in sales for March and according to the letter to employees, the prediction is that April sales will be worse.  Honda has directed all employees that as of April 13th, the days will be designated as “No Work Days”.last_img

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CBA, F-M, J-D tennis players earn sectional titles

first_imgFresh off its historic run to the Section III Class A team championship, the Christian Brothers Academy girls tennis team would follow up with having both of the singles’ finalists in last week’s sectional Division I tournament.This tournament, which started last Tuesday at Syracuse University’s Skytop Courts, offered a rematch of sorts, since Fayetteville-Manlius was also in the field and still remembering how the Brothers beat the Hornets 4-3 in the sectional semifinals Oct. 10 before edging Baldwinsville by that same score in the championship round a day later.No one could beat CBA’s top singles duo of Gieselle Vlassis and Grace DelPino. Vlassis did not drop a game against F-M’s Trisha Adivikolanu in the quarterfinals and then won 6-0, 6-2 over B’ville’s Paige Tromblee in the semifinals. F-M meanwhile, had its doubles team of Anna Manta and Phoebe Wang prove just as dominant, not dropping a set in any of their matches on the way to the Division I sectional title.Manta and Wang just three games of its first two matches before a hard-fought 6-4, 7-6 win over Liverpool’s Julia Schewe and Angelica Underwood in the semifinals. Then, in the finals Saturday at Oneida High School, Manta and Wang claimed a 6-1, 6-1 romp over West Genesee’s Angelina Llanos and Katie Viau.CBA had Grace Catalano and Aubrey Mills earn a berth in the state qualifier thanks to sweeping F-M’s Alexis Ahn and Emma Zogg 6-4, 6-3 in the quarterfinals. Catalano and Mills lost in the semifinals to Llanos and Viau 6-2, 6-2.Schewe and Underwood had taken out CBA’s Annie Kilmartin and Isabella Mead in the round of 16, with F-M’s Maya Mckenzie and Camila Wojtasiewicz beating the Brothers’ Lily Geneocco and Maddie Tallman 6-3, 7-5 before Llanos and Viau beat them 6-0, 6-2.Jamesville-DeWitt, taking part in the Division II sectional tournament, had its doubles team of Mona Farah and Tara Pollock earn the championship in a classic battle with Oneida’s Mattie Hicks and Sydney Lusher.A first set tie-breaker went 7-6 in Farah and Pollock’s favor. Hicks and Lusher won the second set 6-3, but the final set went to the J-D pair in a 6-4 decision.Prior to this, Farah and Pollock beat Julia Guest and Sadie Urtz (Cortland) 6-1, 6-1 before topping Chittenango’s Abbie Austin and Allison Soulier by those same scores. In the semifinals, Farah and Pollock stopped Whitesboro’s Kylie Cleary and Karlie Cubino 6-1, 6-2.J-D’s Riya Sharma and Lana Wisniewski lost in the round of 16, as did Libby Blair and Serena Patel, with each of these Red Rams pairs falling in two sets.Moving to singles, J-D’s Inika Gajra won 6-7, 6-0, 6-3 over Homer’s Ellis Han in the first round, but lost a 6-1, 5-7, 6-3 battle with New Hartford’s Nicole Farkouh in the quarterfinals as Celia Reid lost in the first round to Chittenango’s Brooke DiFlorio 6-1, 6-1.East Syracuse Minoa had two teams in the doubles field, with Julia Barnwell and Alana Day losing in the single-set opening round and the Spartans’ duo of Katie Schmidt and Megan Volz doing the same.In Division IV, there was Manlius-Pebble Hill having Parmees Fazeli reach the singles semifinals. Fazeli blanked Beaver River’s Caitlynn Woodward 6-0, 6-0 in the quarterfinals before a 6-3, 7-5 semifinal defeat to Utica-Notre Dame’s Emily Lyga.In doubles,Amitees Fazeli and Caroline Mezzalingua also got to the semifinals, winning in the quarterfinals 6-4, 6-3 over Sauquoit Valley’s Ella and Olivia Luczak before a 7-5, 6-2 semifinal loss to Utica-Notre Dame’s tandem of Samantha Fluty and Caitlyn Snyder.Bishop Grimes’ Sarah Falgiatano and Sofia Ziankoski won a first-round 6-4, 6-3 decision over MPH’s Emma Gross and Eden Hldebrandt  before Flury and Snyder beat them 6-1, 6-4 a round later.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Meanwhile, DelPino got a 6-3, 6-1 quarterfinal win over the Hornets’ Samhitha Adivikolanu and met another B’ville star, Brooke Tutor, in the semifinals, with DelPino winning 6-0, 6-3.Facing each other in the sectional final Friday on their home court at CBA, Vlassis proved too much for DelPino, prevailing in straight sets 6-2, 6-2.Tutor had earlier eliminated F-M’s Angela Iskander 6-1, 6-1, while another CBA singles player, Julia DelPino, could not get out of the opening round, falling 2-6, 6-4, 6-3 to Liverpool’s Diana Kozenyatko.center_img Tags: CBAF-MJ-DTennislast_img read more

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Rowing : Split opinions dominate men’s crew’s exclusion from NCAA

first_img Published on May 10, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Nick: nctoney@syr.edu | @nicktoneytweets Gina Biascoechea understands the benefits of Title IX. But the sophomore Syracuse women’s rower doesn’t understand why her sport has to be split by sex.‘Our team (the SU women’s rowing team) gets an earlier season, more team gear and more scholarships,’ Biascoechea said.The NCAA has never been affiliated with the country’s oldest intercollegiate sport, men’s rowing. But women’s rowing is a different story.When the SU women’s rowing team raced on May 1, on Mercer Lake in West Windsor, N.J., it finished fourth in the Big East championship, in an NCAA-affiliated meet. Women’s rowing is an official NCAA sport with recognized conferences and an official NCAA championship in three divisions. Men’s rowing is not.The Intercollegiate Rowing Association is the men’s answer to NCAA rowing exclusion. But SU men’s rowing head coach Dave Reischman said winning a Big East championship would be more glamorous than winning the IRA.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘It’d be great for the men’s team to be able to say we were the best in the Big East,’ Reischman said. ‘People get that, and name recognition would come easily because of the Big East conference. ‘The reason for the divide in collegiate rowing between genders is simple. It comes down to Title IX. The 1972 Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act stipulates that all federally funded programs must offer equal opportunities and dedicate equal resources to men and women.Women’s rowing became an NCAA-affiliated sport in 1996, in part to help the scholarship inequities addressed by Title IX legislation.The size of a Division I college football roster makes resources less available for other men’s teams. Syracuse football has 85 permitted scholarship athletes.Women’s rowing teams help offset the gender disparity created by football. Reischman said teams can have up to 60 participants and 20 full scholarships.‘I don’t find it fair that the women’s crew team has more advantages than the men’s team because of the football team,’ said Biascoechea, the SU women’s rower.Adding an entire men’s rowing team — and the scholarships, trips, meals, housing and other services that come with NCAA athletes — would further scramble the gender participation balance Title IX strives to achieve, regardless of how long colleges have been racing.But to Craig Amerkhanian, Stanford’s director of rowing, excluding deserving student-athletes isn’t fair, regardless of gender.‘Men’s rowing would enhance the image and mission of the NCAA,’ Amerkhanian said. ‘They would perform at the highest level in the classroom and on the water, just like any other student-athlete.’Amerkhanian said men’s rowing needs the major conferences associated with rowing — the Pac-10, the Big Ten and the Big East — to get behind deserving rowers and propose legislation to affiliate men’s rowing with the NCAA. But men’s crew has made no such proposal, said Cameron Schuh, the NCAA’s associate director of public and media relations.A few schools did petition the NCAA for inclusion in 2005. But it didn’t garner enough support. Reischman said the doomed petition was the last window of opportunity for men’s crew to become NCAA-sanctioned.If the implementation of Title IX started to close that window, the customs associated with more than 150 years of men’s rowing may slam it shut. Many rowers and coaches nationwide don’t want the NCAA to interfere with the way they’ve always operated.Syracuse men’s team co-captain Mike Gennaro said keeping rowing traditions intact outweighs any prospect of gender equity in the sport.‘I can’t see men’s rowing becoming an NCAA sport because of all of the tradition involved with the sport,’ Gennaro said. ‘It’s been this way for decades, and changing things now could potentially complicate things just as much as it would organize things.’One of those traditions is shirt trading, a custom in which the winning boat of a race receives the shirts of the losing team’s rowers. Reischman said that at the IRA Championships, a rower in the winning boat will receive 16 shirts from 16 losing teams.But shirt-trading would be viewed as gambling should men’s rowing become NCAA-affiliated and the tradition would be subject to NCAA sanctioning, Reischman said. Two more rowing rituals, freshman races and lightweight crew, would also end under NCAA rules.Traditions aside, Amerkhanian believes a potential NCAA inclusion would benefit all of men’s rowing. The United States Olympic Rowing Team, for instance, would have a broader field of student-athletes to pick from.‘It is absolutely time for the oldest collegiate sport to become a part of the NCAA,’ Amerkhanian said.But if NCAA inclusion for men’s rowing becomes a question of gender impartiality, Reischman said the answer isn’t that obvious.‘Was it fair that from 1852 — when our sport first started racing — to about 30 years ago, women had limited opportunities in sports across the board?’ Reischman said. ‘It wasn’t fair. And if staying out of the NCAA is something that helps correct that in some small way, then I’ll stay with the IRA.’nctoney@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

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