Tag: 贵族宝贝

Ellies 2009 Fast Company Editor We Know Were Lucky to be Doing

first_imgMansueto Ventures’ Fast Company, the 725,000-circ. business magazine, has been nominated by the American Association of Magazine Editors for general excellence in the 500,000 to 1 million circulation category at tonight’s National Magazine Awards. (The magazine won a general excellence Ellie in 1999 and was a finalist in 2000.)Fast Company editor and managing director Robert Safian [pictured] spoke with FOLIO: about this year’s general excellence nomination.FOLIO:: How did you react when you found out Fast Company was nominated?Safian: I was very excited. I sent an email to the staff titled, “Let the celebrations begin.”  I’m mindful that being nominated is a tremendous recognition. Even if we don’t come back with an Ellie, the team should feel like winners. They’ve earned it. FOLIO:: The nomination is for several issues. Why did you submit those particular issues? What was the biggest story you covered there?Safian: We chose the issues we felt were most eclectic, dynamic and accessible. The one issue we knew we had to include was June, because it features a 19,000-word, 24-page article written by Richard Behar and edited by executive editor Will Bourne titled “China Storms Africa” [which is also nominated for excellence in reporting]. It was our single biggest editorial investment of the year.FOLIO:: What was your biggest challenge in putting those issues together?Safian: We are a smaller publisher, with fewer resources than most of our competitors. Our challenge is to do more with less. Fortunately, the writers and editors on our team have an uncanny ability to mix discipline with creativity.FOLIO:: It’s a tough time for magazines and for business magazines in general. How do you keep your editors motivated and optimistic?Safian: We know that we’re lucky to be doing what we do.FOLIO:: Will Fast Company exist in print five years from now?Safian: There will be plenty of print magazines in five years. We certainly hope to be one of them.last_img read more

Read more…

Essar Bags 54 Million Contract from Saudi Aramco

first_imgEssar Projects, an engineering company on Tuesday announced that it has bagged a $54 million (₹328 crore) project from Saudi Arabian national oil and natural gas company Aramco.The project, which is scheduled to be completed in two-and-a-half years, will involve procurement and construction of crude tank, replacement of crude pumps, piping, electrical and instrumental facilities.”This contract is a reflection of our capability to undertake global projects from reputed clients in this region. We will leverage the capabilities gained to enhance our foot print in other Middle East countries,” Amit Gupta, CEO of Hydrocarbon SBU, Essar Projects said in a statement.The company has previously set up a world-scale grass roots refinery at Vadinar, Gujarat, with an initial capacity of 10 million tonnes per annum, which was later expanded to 14 MMTPA and then to 20 MMTPA.The company had also implemented Single Buoy Mooring (SBM) method for crude unloading, product jetty for refinery product export, a tank farm with total capacity of 3 million cubic metres for crude, and 77 MW of captive power plant.However, on Tuesday, stock price of Essar Oil Limited recorded 0.48 percent lower at ₹114.40 per share.On 3 August last year, Saudi Aramco and Sumitomo Chemical transferred ownership of 32 billion riyal ($8.5 billion) petrochemical facility to their joint group PetroRabigh, Reuters reported.Ownership of the planned new factory will be transferred from Aramco and Sumitomo to PetroRabigh in the fourth quarter of 2014, the company said on Sunday.last_img read more

Read more…

Anil Ambani Announces Rs5000 Crore New Defence Investment

first_imgWith the recent acquisition of Pipavav Defence, Reliance Group chairman Anil Ambani announced on Thursday that an additional investment of Rs.5,000 crore will be made as part of India’s emphasis on “Make in India” for military hardware and cut imports.He also underscored the need for larger public-private partnerships in the defence domain, and called for pooling of resources so that India becomes self-reliant in protecting its boundaries and cuts reduces its dependence on the global markets.Quoting extensively from the experiences he gained from his late father, the legendary industrialist Dhirubhai Ambani, the Reliance Group chairman said his father’s vision was to meet the aspirations of generations with self reliance, adding that the Make in India initiative of Prime Minister Narendra Modi is a major step towards that.”This initiative of the government redefines the defence ecosystem in India with our Navy in the lead… For a country with one of the longest coastlines in the region and vast expanse of territories over the seas, self reliance in naval capabilities is an ever challenging imperative,” he said.The Reliance Group chairman said the acquisition of the Pipavav Defence Company in Gujarat with assets worth more than Rs.10,000 crore was his company’s contribution towards self reliance.”Pipavav has the largest dry dock in the country and the second largest in the world. With more than 30 lakh sq ft of covered area for fabrication and integration alone, this is perhaps the largest single location defence manufacturing facility in India,” he said.”We will invest an additional Rs.5,000 crore over the next few years as part of our commitment towards indigenisation efforts.”He said that the Pipavav facility will be capable to deliver “all requirements of the Indian Navy from frigates to aircraft carriers to submarines”.Russia, meanwhile, has chosen Pipav as a partner to build three updated versions of Talwar-class frigates, likely to be the biggest-ever warship-building project for private sector in India worth around $3-$3.5 crore.Ambani said self reliance in defence is also needed so that India does not have to compromise on its foreign policy.”Large part of our Defence inventory have dependency on global relations. This creates limitations and sub-serves our foreign policy. Self-reliance gives us the flexibility to pursue our foreign policy objectives,” he said.He said since the sole consumer for domestic defence hardware was the government, “specific measures towards ease of doing business will encourage industry participation”. Accordingly, he suggested an advisory committee with chief executives from public and private sectors to meet regulary to “align and converge the understanding and aspirations of all stakeholders”.”There is need to institutionalise private sector participation not only for indigenisation but the entire spectrum of defence production through groups comprising Private Sector companies and PSUs at MoD to pool resources,” he said also suggesting a separate joint secretary in the defence ministry for the private sector.”Today, in the ministry of Defence we have joint secretaries responsible for different public sector undertakings. I believe there is a case for a joint secretary exclusively to engage at the business level with the private sector,” he said.Ambani also expressed hope that the updated defence procurement procedure (DPP) will help “in ease of doing business with MoD… Transparent, fair procedures and processes creates a favourable climate, encourage competitiveness and eventually deliver the best overall value for the country,” he said.Another suggestion from the industrialist was to introduce courses at IITs, IIMs and other higher learning institution related to the requirements of the defence industry.last_img read more

Read more…

Twin Taliban blasts near Afghan parliament kill 21

first_imgTwin Taliban blasts struck near the Afghan parliament in Kabul Tuesday, killing at least 21 people and wounding 45 others in the rush-hour attack that shattered a relative lull in violence in the capital.Taliban insurgents immediately claimed responsibility for the bombings, which struck as employees were exiting the parliament complex.”The first explosion happened outside the parliament… a number of innocent workers were killed and wounded. It was caused by a suicide bomber on foot,” Zabi, an injured parliament security guard, told AFP.”The second one was a car bomb. It was parked on the other side of the road and flung me back when it detonated,” he said.The blasts left 21 people dead and 45 others wounded, most of them civilians including parliament employees, a security official told AFP, requesting anonymity.Another security official said the explosions had left “dozens of people dead”.Around 70 wounded people had been rushed to hospitals, a health ministry spokesman told AFP.The blasts went off near a parliament annexe, which houses offices of some lawmakers.But Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said the explosions targeted a vehicle belonging to Afghanistan’s main intelligence agency.The Taliban are pressing ahead with nationwide attacks despite the onset of winter, when fighting usually ebbs, as international efforts to jumpstart peace talks falter.Repeated bids to launch peace negotiations with the Taliban have failed, with a fierce new fighting season expected to kick off in the spring.Earlier on Tuesday, a suicide bomber blew himself up in Lashkar Gah, the capital of the volatile southern province of Helmand, killing seven people, the local police chief said.The attacks underline concerns over growing insecurity in Afghanistan, where around 10,000 US troops are assisting struggling Afghan forces to combat a resilient Taliban insurgency along with Al-Qaeda and Islamic State militants.Afghanistan last week welcomed the Pentagon’s decision to deploy some 300 US Marines to Helmand, where American forces engaged in heated combat until their mission ended in 2014.The Marines will head to the poppy-growing province this spring to assist a NATO-led mission to train Afghan forces, in the latest sign that foreign forces are increasingly being drawn back into the worsening conflict.Afghanistan got scarcely a passing mention in the bitterly contested US presidential election — even though the situation in the conflict-torn country will be an urgent matter for the new president.President-elect Donald Trump has given few details on his expected foreign policy, with even fewer specifics on how he will tackle the war in Afghanistan.last_img read more

Read more…

Indian anchor reads report of husbands death live

first_imgIndian anchor reads report of husband`s death live An Indian television presenter has been praised for her calmness and bravery after reading out a breaking news report of a road accident which killed her husband.Supreet Kaur was presenting a news bulletin on the IBC-24 news channel in Chhattisgarh state on Saturday when a reporter phoned in live with details of an accident which killed three of the five people travelling in an SUV.The report did not name the victims. But Kaur, 28, realised her husband was probably among those killed as he was travelling on the same route and at the same time with four others, the channel’s news chief Anshuman Sharma told AFP.“When the reporter said all the victims were from Bhilai and were travelling in a Renault Duster, she immediately had a hunch her husband had died in the crash.”Kaur nevertheless kept her composure. Only when the bulletin was over did she rush from the studio to confirm her fears.“She is an extremely brave woman. She has been with us for the last nine years. We are really proud of her,” said Sharma of Kaur, who was married two years ago.Social media users heaped praise on Kaur, calling her a hero.“Salute Supreet’s strength in dealing with her husband’s demise with extraordinary bravery & professionalism,” tweeted the state chief minister Raman Singh.“Supreet Kaur: Salute. And deepest sympathies,” author and commentator Shobha De wrote on Twitter.last_img
Read more…

Quader finds BNP manifesto joke of the year

first_imgBangladesh Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader. File PhotoDescribing BNP’s election manifesto as a colourful balloon full of unrealistic pledges, Awami League general secretary Obaidul Quader on Tuesday said it will implode immediately if the party comes to power, reports UNB.”BNP has presented some unrealistic and weird promises which can’t be fulfilled,” he said, describing the election manifesto as the best joke of the year.The AL leader came up with the remarks while talking to reporters at a restaurant by the Dhaka-Chattogram highway in Chouddagram upazila of the district.BNP rolled out its manifesto for the 11th parliamentary elections on Tuesday with a set of promises, including making democracy an everyday practice, building a vengeance -free Bangladesh and raising GDP growth to 11 percent.last_img read more

Read more…

Texas Health Officials Say Were Still Quite Vulnerable To Zika This Mosquito

first_imgJORGE SANHUEZA-LYON / KUTZika can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it while pregnant.Mosquito season is upon us, and Texas still isn’t out of the woods when it comes to Zika.The mosquito-borne illness can cause birth defects if a woman is exposed to it while pregnant. Last year, there were 312 cases of Zika reported in the state.KUT’s Ashley Lopez reportsPublic health officials say they are more prepared this season and have a better picture of what to expect. Part of the problem, though, is that Zika didn’t really go anywhere.Some locally transmitted cases continued to pop up near the border during the winter months. That means the disease lingered in the local mosquito population.According to Dr. Peter Hotez, the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, historically warm weather last winter compounded the problem.“We have probably not had a huge die-off of the Aedes aegypti mosquito in places like San Antonio or in Houston,” he said, referring to the type of mosquito linked to Zika.The Aedes aegypti mosquito also happens to be prevalent in Texas, specifically in densely populated areas. Hotez said the combination of all of this is not good.“I am quite worried that we’re still quite vulnerable to Zika virus transmission,” he said.State health officials said they’re worried, too.“Certainly it’s something we’re on guard for” said Chris Van Deusen, a spokesman for the Texas Department of State Health Services. “We’ve continued our planning, continued working with local health departments, with mosquito control, folks around the state to provide some additional funds for Zika control, Zika planning. And that’s certainly something we’re going to continue working with throughout the summer.”Van Deusen said officials are also drawing on lessons learned from last year’s Zika cases.“One thing that we’ve done recently is further expanded our testing criteria, particularly in the valley,” he said. The agency now recommends testing for all pregnant women in Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata counties in South Texas Van Deusen and Hotez said the importance of actively testing humans for Zika was one of the bigger lessons learned.“And second, we’re not really getting a lot of help from the federal government,” Hotez said. “So, the state of Texas is kind of on our own.”There have been 10 Zika cases reported in Texas so far this year. All of them have been related to travel. Copyright 2017 KUT-FM. To see more, visit KUT-FM. Sharelast_img read more

Read more…

Green Joins Cardinals as Associate Head Coach

first_img LOUISVILLE, Ky. – University of Louisville men’s soccer head coach John Michael Hayden announced the hiring of Bryan Green as associate head coach.Green comes to Louisville after spending the past five seasons as the head coach at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn. While at Belmont, Green guided the Bruins through two conference changes and led the program to their first postseason win in the Southern Conference and the first overall since 2008. Green produced eight All-Freshman conference team selections, three All-Conference selections, and one Freshman of the Year recipient. “We are so thrilled to add Bryan Green to our coaching staff,” said Hayden. “His past experiences of leading a Division I program and assisting at other nationally ranked programs certainly stood out in the hiring process.”Prior to Belmont, Green coached for Drexel University. Starting as the first assistant in 2010, Green was promoted to associate head coach in 2012. Green helped guide the Dragons to their first Colonial Athletic Association Tournament championship in 2013, the same season they were also regular season champions. Green also assisted in earning the program back-to-back NCAA Championship bids in 2012 and 2013, the program’s first bids in 40 years.”I want to thank John Michael for this opportunity to be a part of the success of Louisville Athletics. From the first time I spoke with him about his vision for the UofL men’s soccer program, I was inspired to be a part of it,” said Green. “The program is coming off a great year and an ACC Championship, yet everyone is still hungry for more. I am thrilled to be a part of a group with that mentality and helping John Michael, the staff and team build on that history of success.”Prior to Drexel, Green played an integral part of the coaching staff at West Virginia from 2003-10, where he was the first assistant and recruiting coordinator. Green helped direct the program to three consecutive NCAA Championship bids from 2005-07 and four consecutive top 30-ranked recruiting classes from 2006-09. Green was a part of the 2006 Big East Coaching Staff of the Year, which was awarded to the Mountaineers staff after a Big East regular season championship title and runner-up finish in the Big East Tournament. “When looking to bring individuals into our program, we look to those who possess high integrity and a desire to be successful. Without question, Bryan will help us achieve our goals because of these qualities,” explained Hayden. “He joins assistant coach Donovan Dowling, volunteer coach Robbe Tarver, analyst Nick Blackwell and director of operations James Kusak in rounding out our coaching staff. Together, these individuals make up what I consider to be the best staff in the country. We’re all driven, hardworking and eager for success. Our players will benefit tremendously from working with these talented individuals and I am so fortunate to work with each of them as we continue to pursue championships.”Keystone College gave Green his first head coaching opportunity, where he guided the Giants for three seasons from 2000-02. While in charge, Green lead the program to their first NJCAA Region XIX regular season title and advanced to the Region XIX tournament championship game. His 2002 team was ranked as high as No. 2 nationally.Green spent one season as an assistant coach at East Stroudsburg University in 1999, helping guide the team to an NCAA Championship appearance and producing an All-American. Green began his coaching career in 1997 at his alma mater, Elizabethtown College, where he served for two seasons.  The National Soccer Coaches Association of American (NSCAA) has recognized 13 of Green’s teams for academic excellence with the Team Academic Award. A native of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Green played collegiate soccer at Elizabethtown College where he earned All-American and All-Mid Atlantic Conference honors. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Elizabethtown College in 1997 and a Masters of Education in Health and Physical Education from East Stroudsburg University in 2000. He holds a USSF ‘B’ License. Green and his wife Ehren have two sons, Henry and Nathan.Fans can follow Louisville men’s soccer on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram at @UofLmenssoccer. Print Friendly Version Story Linkslast_img read more

Read more…

Protein lifetime and the stability of cell structures

first_img(Phys.org) —The ability of a cell to move, replicate, and recast itself according to the needs of the organism which it serves, comes at it price. The extreme flexibility of cells takes its origin from the constant turnover of nearly every component with which they are made. There are a few exceptions to this general principle for a few protected regions like, for example, the lens of the eye, or the collagen matrix within the extracellular space. In a new paper published in Cell, researchers show that certain components of the pore complex that controls the flow of components out of the nucleus, escape the normal turnover cycle, and may persist for the lifetime of the cell. Some Nuclear pore complex proteins can last for the lifetime of the cell. Credit: learn.genetics.utah.edu More information: Identification of Long-Lived Proteins Reveals Exceptional Stability of Essential Cellular Structures, Cell, Volume 154, Issue 5, 971-982, 29 August 2013. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2013.07.037AbstractIntracellular proteins with long lifespans have recently been linked to age-dependent defects, ranging from decreased fertility to the functional decline of neurons. Why long-lived proteins exist in metabolically active cellular environments and how they are maintained over time remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a system-wide identification of proteins with exceptional lifespans in the rat brain. These proteins are inefficiently replenished despite being translated robustly throughout adulthood. Using nucleoporins as a paradigm for long-term protein persistence, we found that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are maintained over a cell’s life through slow but finite exchange of even its most stable subcomplexes. This maintenance is limited, however, as some nucleoporin levels decrease during aging, providing a rationale for the previously observed age-dependent deterioration of NPC function. Our identification of a long-lived proteome reveals cellular components that are at increased risk for damage accumulation, linking long-term protein persistence to the cellular aging process. The ‘weakest link’ in the aging proteome Journal information: Cell Extracellular proteins, like crystallins of the lens, or components of cartilage, accumulate damage over time that compromises their function. Clouded vision or stiff joints are the familiar result. Inside cells however, an intricate accounting system exists whereby proteins are stochastically festooned with sequential markers for degradation—much like a trainee might predictably progresses through the colored ranks of Karate. In yeast, it has been reported that the average protein half-life is just 90 minutes, while for mammals it may be more like 1 or 2 days.An exception to this rule is our DNA, which owes its long life to dedicated repair mechanisms that patch up damage. For proteins however, no such sequence-level mechanisms are known to exist. The histone proteins that bind DNA have also been observed, in some cases, to be exceptionally long-lived. Measuring these lifetimes reliably, particularly for the older generation, requires some special experimental considerations. The researchers used a method called pulse-chase labeling, which requires feeding newborn rats a diet containing exclusively the 15N isotope as the pulse. A normal 14N diet, the chase, was begun after 6 weeks, and the animals then sacrificied at various times over the ensuing year. The cellular components were then fractionated and mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively identify long-lived proteins in the brain. The lifespans of a few components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) were particularly striking. The NPC contains multiple copies of over 30 different subvarieties of the nucleoporin (Nup) family alone. Two particular subcomplexes of Nup proteins, which serve as scaffold components, where found to resist degradation. The researchers also measured translation levels of these and 11,000 other proteins to measure synthesis levels concomitantly. Every long-lived protein was found to also be actively involved in translation.Unlike other large protein complexes, such as ribosomes or proteasomes, the NPC apparently does not turnover as an entire complex. Instead individual subcomplexes are exchanged at specific rates as new copies are synthesized. What mechanisms might administer this exchange, if any, are as yet unknown. The researchers found, in particular, that 25% of those proteins within a certain complex (Nup205), have not been replaced after a year. Together with the histone H3.1 protein, that stat earns them the title of most persistent mammalian intracellular protein. The authors speculate that disassembly of entire NPCs might not be practical for the cell because dismantling these key components could jeopardize the integrity of the nuclear envelope. Important nuclear substructure, possibly including epigenetic depots critical for transmitting information beyond the lifetime of an individual cell might then be compromised. They also note that long-lived proteins might also be sources of vulnerability within the proteome, particular those that would be exposed to harmful metabolites or chemical interlopers. Identification of these elements may therefore be important in understanding the aging process in postmitotic cells.center_img Citation: Protein lifetime and the stability of cell structures (2013, September 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-protein-lifetime-stability-cell.html Explore further © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read more…

Solar cell mystery solved expected to greatly increase efficiency

first_img Explore further But in a new study published in Science Advances, Dong Shi et al. have taken a closer look at spiro-OMeTAD and found that it still has a great deal of untapped potential. For the first time, they have grown single crystals of the pure material, and in doing so, they have made the surprising discovery that spiro-OMeTAD’s single-crystal structure has a hole mobility that is three orders of magnitude greater than that of its thin-film form (which is currently used in solar cells). “This paper reports a major breakthrough for the fields of perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by finally clarifying the potential performance of the material and showing that improving the crystallinity of the hole transport layer is the key strategy for further breakthroughs in device engineering of these solar cells,” Osman Bakr, a professor of engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia and leader of the study, told Phys.org. The findings suggest that, at least in the short term, the time-consuming process of designing and synthesizing radically new organic hole conductors as replacements to spiro-OMeTAD may not be necessary.In general, perovskite solar cells and dye-sensitized solar cells are made of three critical layers. Two of these layers—the electron-transporting layer and the light-absorbing layer—are well-understood structurally. However, the mesoscale packing structure of the hole-transporting layer, which is usually spiro-OMeTAD, has so far eluded researchers, and consequently its charge transport mechanisms have remained a mystery.In the new study, the researchers figured out a way to grow pure single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD by dissolving the spiro-OMeTAD in a carefully chosen solvent. They then placed this vial inside a larger vial containing an antisolvent, in which spiro-OMeTAD does not dissolve as well, and allowed the antisolvent vapor to slowly diffuse into the inner vial. Eventually the solution in the inner vial becomes supersaturated, so that not all of the spiro-OMeTAD can stay dissolved, causing the spiro-OMeTAD to crystallize. The researchers then performed a variety of measurements on the crystals to investigate their charge transport mechanisms and other properties.The results are much more encouraging than expected, in many ways running contrary to the conventional wisdom based on the material’s large-scale structure, which suggested that the material had reached its limits. Although the method used here to grow single crystals cannot be performed at a large scale, the researchers predict that similar methods that use an antisolvent to trigger crystallization could be used to enhance the crystallinity of the thin-layer spiro-OMeTAD, improving its hole mobility in order to make more efficient solar cells.”These astonishing findings open a new direction for the development of perovskite solar cells and dye-sensitized solar cells by showing the still untapped potential of spiro-OMeTAD,” Bakr said. “They unravel a key mystery that has confounded the photovoltaic community for the last 17 years.” (Left) The set-up used to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, based on antisolvent vapor-assisted crystallization. (Right) Single crystal structure of spiro-OMeTAD. Credit: Shi, et al. ©2016 AAAS Pinholes be gone More information: Dong Shi, et al. “Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering.” Science Advances. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501491AbstractWe report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells. © 2016 Phys.orgcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Science Advances Citation: Solar cell mystery solved, expected to greatly increase efficiency (2016, April 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-04-solar-cell-mystery-greatly-efficiency.html (Phys.org)—For the past 17 years, spiro-OMeTAD, has been keeping a secret. Despite intense research efforts, its performance as the most commonly used hole-transporting material in perovskite and dye-sensitized solar cells has remained stagnant, creating a major bottleneck for improving solar cell efficiency. Thinking that the material has given all it has to offer, many researchers have begun investigating alternative materials to replace spiro-OMeTAD in future solar cells.last_img read more

Read more…

Charkha to provide jobs to five crore women

first_imgThe Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Giriraj Singh, on Monday, said that following the ‘Khadi for Fashion’ call by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the ministry had planned to connect at least five crore village women to Charkha (spinning wheel).Addressing the Gandhi Jayanti Celebrations at Khadi Bhawan in Connaught Place, the minister said that Khadi has now become popular among younger generation too. “For a significant span of time Khadi was meant for either dadaji (older ones) or netaji (politicians). But, due to the initiatives and appeals made by our Prime Minister – who is himself the latest USP of Khadi –Khadi has now become a fashion trend among the youth,” he said, adding, “Even the results speak. The previous governments could increase the sale by only 70 percent in 10 odd years, but we enhanced it to 90 percent.” Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSpeaking of solar charkhas, the minister said that it would provide employment to at least five crore village women in the coming five years. “With five pilot projects at Varanasi, Nawada and other places, we are already on our heels with this project. It will ensure a regular income between Rs 6000 and Rs 10,000 to each of the women,” he said. The minister claimed that in efforts to make Khadi a fashion brand across the globe, the department is in regular contact with all leading fashion institutes of the country. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSingh further added that even in Africa, as a part of centenary Year celebrations of Gandhiji’s Swadeshi Movement, the High Commission of India in Uganda, in association with the Republic of Uganda, is unveiling the Gandhi Charkha – gifted by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) – at the Gandhi Heritage Site at Jinja in Uganda. Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) Chairman Vinai Kumar Saxena, in his address, said that Khadi has been spreading its wings in all directions for creating maximum job opportunities for the artisans. “Since sanitation and Khadi was close to Mahatma Gandhi’s heart, the KVIC is all set to take his legacy forward,” he said, adding, “We have also taken Prime Minister’s call of ‘Sweet Revolution’ very seriously and we are trying to give a major push to our ‘Honey Mission’ in the coming days.” Arun Kumar Panda, secretary, MSME, also laid stress upon enhancing the total turnover of Khadi and Village Industries. Earlier, the minister inaugurated 60 Khadi outlets – which were renovated and re-launched during the completion of KVIC’s 60th anniversary and a Khadi outlet at Chaudhary Charan Singh International Airport at Lucknow, through remote device. He also handed over the cheques to five artisans each from two Khadi institutions of Uttar Pradesh and Haryana, under the new sales initiatives undertaken by KVIC. Later, he inaugurated a Honey Parlour – showcasing several qualities of honey – at Palika Bazaar.last_img read more

Read more…

India signs bullet train deal with Japan

first_imgIndia has signed an agreement with Japan for the development of its high-speed rail network. The deal was formalised during Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s three-day state visit to India which also yielded deeper defense ties and a plan for civil nuclear cooperation.Under the terms of the agreement, Japan will support the development of India’s first high-speed rail link, which will connect Mumbai with Ahmedabad. The deal formed part of a US$12 billion rail support package for India, which takes the form of a low-interest loan.“I cannot think of a strategic partnership that can exercise a more profound influence on shaping the course of Asia and our interlinked ocean regions more than ours. This enterprise will launch a revolution in Indian railways and speed up India’s journey into the future”, said Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The deployment of Japanese bullet train technology on the 505km Mumbai-Ahmedabad line is expected to slash the eight-hour rail journey down to just three hours.last_img read more

Read more…

Facebook is stepping up its video efforts with a n

first_imgFacebook is stepping up its video efforts with a new ‘suggested video’ feature that will reportedly see the social network share ad revenues with video creators for the first time.According to various US news outlets briefed on the plans, Facebook will place ads between suggested video clips, keeping 45% of revenues and paying 55% out to content partners.The suggested videos feature will serve up content related to previous videos watched on the site, with the social network already said to be conducting tests with professional content makers like the NBA, Fox Sports, Hearst and Funny or Die.The move has widely been seen as an effort by Facebook to step up competition with the likes of YouTube and attract more premium content to the site.A recent research report by Ampere Analysis said it expects Facebook to trigger an “advertising ‘arms race’” by competing directly against YouTube for user-uploaded video audiences and that the trials with content owners like NFL and Fox Sports suggest Facebook is “primed to become a plausible alternative to YouTube.”Separately, in a ‘Townhall Q&A’ earlier this week in which Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered questions from site users, Zuckerberg said that in the future “video will be even more important than photos” on the service.Asked about the future of Facebook, Zuckerberg said: “We used to just share in text, and now we post mainly with photos. In the future video will be even more important than photos. After that, immersive experiences like VR will become the norm.Eventually, Zuckerberg said he thinks people will have the power to share “full sensory and emotional experience” and that “one day, I believe we’ll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology.”last_img read more

Read more…

Interviewed by Louis James Editor International

first_img(Interviewed by Louis James, Editor, International Speculator) L: Marin, it’s been a long time since we asked you for an update on energy markets, which are your specialty. Given all that Doug says is coming down the pike, what do you see ahead, and how does one invest? Marin: I think that for the most part, we’ll see a continuation of what we’ve seen for the last 18 months… L: That’s not an encouraging thought. Marin: Maybe so, but that’s the reality of what I see in the markets, especially when it comes to the juniors. There are a lot of subsectors of the energy markets for which I’ve been telling people to stay away from the juniors for at least 18 to 24 months. Thermal coal is an example. I’m glad we’ve stayed away, as the thermal-coal companies have become massive destroyers of wealth. L: Can you elaborate on that? We still need coal, so why aren’t the current low prices a “buy low, sell high” setup? Marin: Well, there are two factors to consider. First, as I mentioned on national TV about two years ago, permitting coal projects – not just for production, but even for exploration – was going to become very, very difficult… especially in North America. L: All these people up in arms about “mountaintop mining” and such? Marin: Exactly. The reality is that nobody wants a coal mine in their back yard. This affects both thermal and metallurgical coal projects, but the two face different market dynamics. Met coal got slaughtered because of decreased steel manufacturing, while thermal coal got slaughtered because of the competition from natural gas. Still, both saw lower prices, and in an environment of much more difficult and expensive permitting, the companies are getting trashed. L: And the second factor? Marin: That’s the new carbon tax the Obama administration is pushing. Believe it or not, the oil companies are actually supporting it. L: Why on earth would they do that? Marin: Because many of them are not just oil companies. A company like Exxon is as much a gas company as it is an oil company, and they’re having a hard time competing with the national oil companies on the global market. So, they’ve come home and are buying up large reserves of natural gas, making a heavy commitment to North American natural gas. So it’s in their interest jump on the Obama bandwagon and increase taxes on coal to benefit their gas investments in North America. L: Politics as usual. Got it. So, we keep staying away from coal, especially thermal coal. What about uranium? That’s been in the news a lot lately as well, with Japan doing an about-face on its nuclear program. Marin: Yes, the new president of Japan basically stated that Japan has no choice but to bring its reactors back online. But it’s not going to happen as quickly as the market wants it to happen, so while we’ve made good money on uranium plays in the last few months – and I’m very bullish on uranium – we’ve taken profits on our winners in our energy letters. We still have core holdings. Actually, we’ve written that we believe that Fukushima is the beginning of the fourth great bull market for uranium. With the Chinese, Russians, Koreans, and other countries committing to nuclear energy as part of their energy matrix, even after Fukushima the trend is very solid. By 2020, there’s going to be another 88 reactors online. And already today, the US imports over 90% of the uranium it consumes. To put that into perspective, consider that in 1960, the US was the world’s largest uranium producer. At the time, there were over 1,000 uranium mines in the US, producing over 36 million pounds of uranium every year. Today, there are eleven uranium mines, producing 3.4 million pounds a year. So America is producing less than 10% of what it produced in 1960, and yet is more dependent than ever on nuclear energy. One in every ten homes in America is powered by Russian uranium. L: Wow… I can see why you’re still bullish. What else do you like these days? Marin: One of the most interesting and powerful market dynamics I see today is the European addiction to Russian natural resources. That can’t change quickly, and there is a great potential for profit. The way we approach it in our letters is to ask ourselves how we can profit from the Putinization of Europe. It’s not just oil and gas, but uranium as well, and non-energy resources. We’ve found several profitable niches. L: Okay. But getting back to the original question, if Doug Casey is right about the Greater Depression gathering force this year, that would seem bearish for energy. How do you strategize for that? Marin: I think there’s a good chance Doug is right. So, in our newsletters, the first things we look at are management, cash, and expenditure programs in the specific jurisdictions the companies operate. We want companies that have a lot of cash, and will not need to go back to the market any time soon. From an equities standpoint in the resource sector, that’s the ultimate Achilles heel of most resource companies. The reality is that most are, as Doug likes to day, burning matches. L: Sure, but you don’t want companies that are just sitting on cash. Marin: Of course. We want companies that have the cash and the ability to advance a project that will deliver value. They need to have a project with technical merit, in a place where they can get it permitted – we use the same 8 Ps you do. Most important is that even if they do have the cash, get permitted, and drill a successful well, do they have the infrastructure to deliver that oil to the market and make money doing so? Energy is very different from mining. Certain wells are extremely expensive to drill, and you don’t really know what you’ll get until you do drill them. Once you do, you know right away if it worked out, what you have, and you can go into production if it all works out. Mining exploration is much cheaper, and the big capital expenditures don’t come until after you know what you have, and have done a feasibility study on it. L: I get it; a big mine can cost several billion dollars to build, but you can drill a grid of holes that outline an ore body for just a couple million bucks. Marin: Yes. A single oil well in Kenya can cost north of $65 million. L: $65 million! I can build a modest but significant gold mine for that much. Marin: Yes, you could build a 25,000 to 45,000-ounces-per-year gold mine for that. But on the positive side, when you make your discovery in the oil patch, the path to cash flow is very short and fast, so the impact on share prices can be explosive. That’s why I love energy stocks. L: Sure; the Casey team likes volatility. And I also see your point about infrastructure. With metals, if you have a concentrate that’s valuable enough – not to mention gold or silver doré bars – you can transport your product anywhere in the world. But if you’ve got a well that’s more gas than oil, and there’s no pipeline network in the area that can handle it, you’ve got a product you can’t sell. Marin: Exactly. L: Okay, let’s talk about political risk – “resource nationalism” being the bogeyman of the day. Where are your favorite places in the world to invest? Are you willing to pay a premium for the safer jurisdictions? Marin: That varies by sector and the type of commodity. Some places are not workable for uranium exploration, for example, even though they are good for other kinds of mineral exploration. So I’m very bullish on WISR uranium production in the US. That is a term we created, so readers will see it here first: Warm In-Situ Recovery. WISR has much lower cost of production than other in-situ recovery projects in the US, comparable to those in Kazakhstan, but with much better environmental standards. I think that’s going to be a strong trend to bet on over the next five years. I’d stay away from uranium plays in Europe, Africa, and South America – the risk is just too high. We’ve had a great run on the Athabasca Basin uranium plays, and having made our money, we’ve taken it back off the table. For oil-patch plays, I really like the East African Rift in Kenya. We were the first to recommend that area play. We’ve also taken profits there, but it’s very interesting what’s going on there. Those are large, world-class deposits being drilled off right now. I’m also very bullish on certain parts of Europe, where there are great, past-producing oil fields that have light, liquid-rich oil, but have not seen any modern exploration. And yet the people living in those places are paying a premium over global energy prices, because they are so dependent on imports from Russia and the Middle East. I’d warn people to be very careful about these junior Canadian oil companies that are chasing yield in the western sedimentary basin. I think there are a lot of risks associated with that, so there’s little room for error. Because of the differentials – investors have to remember that just because you get $90 a barrel for WTI, that doesn’t mean you’ll get the same for Canadian oil far from any distribution infrastructure – any bad news can be fatal. L: So what do you look for in that kind of situation? Very near-term Push? Focus on quick wins, rather than big wins? Marin: Yes. For example, we recommended Atico and PRD Energy at the Casey conference last September, and both have more than doubled since then. Anything we recommend has to have cash in the bank, management have to be the largest shareholders, and they have to go for assets that matter – can really move the needle, by delivering sustainable cash flow. Like you, we start with the People. That’s absolutely critical. L: Very good. Can you give us a sneak preview of what you’re working for upcoming publications? Marin: We have a lot going on. Right now we’re doing a complete analysis of the master limited partnerships and the American oil and gas sector, and a complete analysis on whether the US can actually become energy independent by 2035. I’ll also be publishing an interview with a former senior OPEC official I recently spoke with. Also, a trip to Saudi Arabia is in the works – there’s a lot in the pipeline. We’re looking at juniors in the right places, because that’s where the most volatility is – and the most potential for big profits. But if there is a big global economic pullback, most of these juniors don’t have a chance. It’s so capital intensive… A single ultra-deep oil well offshore can cost more than $100 million. The little guys won’t stand a chance if the market turns negative and stays there for a few years. Maybe one thing we should highlight is that the game has really changed. It’s become so much more expensive, and the big oil companies reserves are decreasing, because of the changing value of their BOEs. L: Not all oil equivalents are really equivalent to oil. Marin: Barrels of oil equivalent – BOEs – are the biggest scam in the energy sector today. They say they have a gas component of their production that’s equivalent to so many barrels of oil, but they don’t define what’s in that gas. Is it methane? Butane? Propane? Pentane? All of these have different and changing values. The SEC allows the companies to roll all of this up as “BOE,” but they are not all equal. And yet, many companies present their reserves as though their reserves were the same thing as oil. This is very important. L: How does the average investor know what the real value of a company’s BOEs are, then? Marin: They have to really dig down deep into the PV10s and other technical disclosures. You have to have the ability to understand these reports and to be willing to put in the time into doing so. This is, I’m proud to say, one of our Casey advantages; we do this for all our energy publications. Few others will put out net-back reports as we do. What matters is not how many BOEs companies produce, but what they get back for them after delivery to the market. I don’t mean to be negative, but a lot of people don’t get this; and, frankly, they’re screwed. L: That’s a technical term. Marin: [Chuckles] Yes. L: Very well, then; words to the wise. Thanks for the interview, brother, and stay safe out there. Marin: You’re welcome, and you too. L: Will do. Marin Katusa is chief energy investment strategist for Casey Research and the editor of two company newsletters on energy: Casey Energy Dividends, which focuses on low-risk dividend-paying energy stocks, and Casey Energy Report, which features junior energy exploration companies with huge profit potential. He also edits an elite alert service that covers fast-moving energy plays in the junior resource sector, Casey Energy Confidential.last_img read more

Read more…